Today's News

  • Pumpkins prevail at Indigo Farms

    Pumpkin Day—a daylong celebration of fall—is set for this Saturday, Oct. 17, at Indigo Farms, a historic farm straddling the state line near Hickmans Crossroads.

    Celebrate the season and pick a passel of pumpkins during the annual event scheduled from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

  • Since when does four years make something an artifact?

    Two weeks ago, I was surfing the Internet, looking for deals on Thomas the Train accessories, when my computer screen went black. There was no warning—it just quit.

    I decided to do a little troubleshooting before resorting to calling the tech support line.

    First I jiggled the cord. Nothing happened. Then I unplugged and re-plugged it several times. Nothing happened. Then I dug out the manual and even pretended read a page or two. Still, nothing happened.

  • Valerio leads West to another victory

    Roberto Valerio paced the West Brunswick boy’s cross-country team to victory in a three-team conference meet in 80-degree weather Oct. 13 at West.

    Valerio was unchallenged in winning the 3.1-mile race in 17 minutes, 50 seconds. He was one of five West runners in the top 10. His finish on the track at M.H. Rourk Stadium was cheered on by a corridor of West students, a scene of school spirit rarely seen at any cross-country meet at any school.

    Teammate John Frink was third in 18:58, his best finish of the season.

  • South golfers win conference title; Gore, Johnson co-medalists

    Leslie Johnson of West Brunswick and Molly Gore of South Brunswick shot 49s and tied for first in the Waccamaw Conference championship golf tournament Oct. 12 at the St. James Founders Course.

    Rain shortened the tournament to nine holes.

    South, with no seniors on its team, won the tournament and qualified for the regional Oct. 20 at Goldsboro Municipal Golf course. Johnson, a sophomore, also qualified.

  • Whiteville beats West Brunswick in OT; North beats South Columbus in OT

    WHITEVILLE—A controversial two-point conversion in overtime gave Whiteville a 22-21 victory over West Brunswick in a Waccamaw Conference football game Friday night at Legion Stadium.

    The referee hesitated before making a call on the play—a fake extra-point kick—that ended at the corner of the goal line at the Whiteville sideline.

    “He did not know what to call,” West coach Jimmy Fletcher said.

    When the official signaled a score, Wolfpack players on the field ran to their teammates on the sideline in celebration.

  • Whodunit? Let's have tea and crumpets, first

    What is it about English murder mysteries that make them so attractive to American audiences?

    Is it the accents? The lack of actual boring police work that goes into finding who killed Lord Upper Crust during a tea party at a Mr. and Mrs. Scone’s lake house? The fact that Lord Upper Crust probably deserved what he got?

  • Stargazing at baseball diamonds

    October is a great month for stargazing. The summer heat has died down, there are fewer bugs, and there is a big baseball diamond in the sky. Because we are finishing baseball season with the World Series, it seems as if the stars want to get in on the action.

    The authentic name for the baseball diamond in the sky is the “Great Square” although you could consider the full name and call it the “Great Square of Pegasus.” Strangely, only three of the four stars belong to the winged horse, Pegasus. One of the four stars belongs to Andromeda.

  • Fall is finally here; it is time to start planting

    I’ve been telling you for years the cooler days and nights of autumn are a great time to plant trees and shrubs in our mild climate. Plants aren’t stressed as much and have a chance to develop a better root system before the heat and humidity of another southern summer arrives.

    Well, all that’s true for most plants, but there are some selections of my favorite group of summer-flowering plants—crape myrtle—that are better planted in late winter and early spring.

  • Brunswick 4-H students celebrate 100 years of 4-H in North Carolina

    Brunswick County 4-H celebrated 100 years of 4-H in North Carolina on Oct. 5 with an evening packed full of activities, including a favorite foods fair, a 4-H themed cake decorating contest, entertainment, a movie and a time capsule dedication.

    The evening began as Brunswick County 4-H Council President Justin Simmons opened festivities with the Pledge of Allegiance, followed by the 4-H pledge led by Brunswick County 4-H Council Secretary/Treasurer Perry Grosch.

  • Crape myrtles Part 1: The appeal of Crape myrtle

    One of North Carolina’s most popular, yet mistreated, landscape plants is the beautiful crape myrtle. Selected and prized for their long summer bloom period (often called the “plant of the 100-day bloom), cultivars have a range of flower colors, with an interesting seed head following the flower.

    Crape myrtles also have lustrous green leaves that change to bright fall colors, subtle to stunning multicolored bark, and unique winter architecture that makes this plant exceed most landscape choices for four-season interest and appeal.