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Today's News

  • Kinderdance gets kids in motion while teaching developmental skills

    A 2004 study conducted by an exercise-science professor from University of South Carolina found preschool children ages 3-5 did not get enough physical activity.

    The study examined the activity of 281 children at preschools in churches, private programs and Head Start. The children received an average of 7.7 minutes an hour of moderate to vigorous activity.

  • Seven of 17 schools make AYP goals

    More than half of the 17 Brunswick County Schools did not meet the federal Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals for 2007-2008, but Superintendent Katie McGee won’t describe them as failing schools.

    Brunswick County Academy, Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary, Leland Middle, Lincoln Elementary, North Brunswick High, South Brunswick Middle, Supply Elementary, Union Elementary, Waccamaw Elementary and West Brunswick High—58.8 percent of Brunswick County schools—did not meet AYPs.

  • Teachers are satisfied with Brunswick County schools

    Gov. Mike Easley has released the 2008 Teacher Working Conditions Initiative Survey, a survey that measures teacher satisfaction with curriculum, instruction and school operations.

    The survey, which has been given to North Carolina teachers since 2002, was completed by 923 teachers in Brunswick County and more than 100,000 teachers statewide.

    Ninety-eight percent of teachers in Brunswick County responded to the survey, 11 percent higher than the state average.

  • Holden Beach commissioners adopt pavilion usage policy

    Holden Beach commissioners adopted a pavilion use policy at their meeting Tuesday night that does not require reservations or deposits—although they are going to see how the policy works to determine if either is needed.

    The new Holden Beach pavilion, or giant gazebo, as some people call it—is on the island under the Holden Beach bridge.

    The town will be allowed to reserve the facility for such things as its popular, free concerts on Sunday nights. Town officials have priority in using the pavilion.

  • First sea turtle hatchlings emerge in Ocean Isle Beach

    Some 118 sea turtle hatchlings have emerged from the first nest at Ocean Isle Beach.

    “We had our first nest hatchee118 babies boiled out like they were ready for that ocean. They were big and very dry,” Gloria Hillenburg, coordinator for the Ocean Isle Beach Turtle Patrol said.

    The hatchlings emerged Monday, during the 55th day of the season.

    Hillenburg added, “We have never had a first nest hatch that soon.”

  • Businesses hopeful bridge rerouting won't hurt them

    SUNSET BEACH—Sure, the new $32 million, 65-foot-tall bridge is going to reroute traffic, but business managers near the old bridge are hopeful it won’t affect their foot traffic.

    Once the new span connecting the mainland and island is complete, projected to be by the end of 2010, there will still be business, said Christy Scott at The Bridge Grill and Par Harbor Mini Golf.

  • Quality customer service is key to attracting, retaining business

    After more than a year of not seeing friends and loved ones in Canada, I was excited recently when a week away from work gave me to chance to fly north to reconnect.

    Waking at 4 a.m., I set out on my adventure to fly several thousand miles and end up in a time zone two hours behind where I started. The flights were uneventful. The layover times were just enough.

    After landing on time at my Canadian destination, I breezed through Customs and patiently waited for my luggage to be unloaded, spin down the rotating conveyor belt and send me on my way.

  • The face of substance abuse may be more familiar than you thought

    Ever wondered what a drug addict looks like? Think you could spot an alcoholic just by looking at them?

    It might not be what you expect.

    It’s not like the movies, and it’s not a problem only facing inner cities or big metropolitan areas. It doesn’t exist solely in dingy, dark alleyways.

    The drug problem, as it has been vaguely dubbed, affects people from all walks of life—it’s not about black or white, rich or poor. It’s about people.

  • Candidates aren't perfect, but they can be positive

    I realize no person is perfect. Keeping that in mind, we cannot expect to have a political candidate who is without flaw.

    Every person has flaws. The ability to recognize your own shortcomings and address them is what makes someone a great leader.

    Earlier this week, the Beacon received a phone call about some “chickens” at the Brunswick County Courthouse. These “chickens” were there to greet Rep. Mike McIntyre as he attempted to address the issues of his constituents at a community forum.

  • Remembering to respect elders

    Large segments of the youth population no longer make a distinction between their personal peers and the adult population. Some young people have not been taught to respect their elders.

    It is disturbing to hear some young people say they only respect their parents and have little or no respect for other adults.

    Some parents are teaching their children to refrain from saying, “yes sir” or “no sir.” They are teaching them to say, “yes” or “no” to everyone regardless of the age or position of the person.