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Today's News

  • Watch out for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac

    Leaves of three, let it be! The single most common cause of allergic reactions in the United States are those nasty plants poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. Each year, these plants cause millions of people to contract a skin rash known as “dermatitis.” Learning how to identify the growing habits of each plant in this area is the first step towards prevention of skin rashes.

    Poison Ivy

  • Get started on your spring garden 'honey-do' list

    We’re working on our first full week of spring and that means lots of garden chores showing up on the honey-do list. If you’re still looking for something to do, go ahead and finish the pruning chores, fertilize your shrub beds if they need it and add a bit of fresh mulch, but leave the lawn fertilizer in the bag for now and try to resist the urge to plant summer annuals unless you’re prepared to lose them to a late frost.

  • Inmate's death an 'accident'

    Senaca Marrell Vaught, an inmate who died Jan. 23 while in custody at the Brunswick County Detention Center, died from “positional asphyxia due to restraint,” according to the chief medical examiner’s report.

    Dr. Charles Garrett performed the autopsy Jan. 24, and the chief medical examiner’s report states Vaught’s death was accidental.

    Morbid obesity was listed as a contributing cause to Vaught’s death.

  • Brunswick County has annual Republican convention

    Bill Daughtridge, a North Carolina Representative from Rocky Mount, gave the keynote address at the Brunswick County Republican convention last Saturday.

    Daughtridge is the Republican candidate for treasurer of North Carolina. Since he is unopposed in the May 6 primary, he will compete in November's election to fill the treasurer's position being vacated by Democrat Richard Moore.

    As the convention was being called to order by Brunswick County Chairman Frank Iler, a straw poll for governor was taken among Brunswick County Republicans present.

  • Free series provides advice for small businesses

    SHALLOTTE—A free monthly business advice session over breakfast is proving popular with local business owners.

    That’s not surprising, since according to the Employment Security Commission, 80 percent of Brunswick County’s businesses have less than 30 employees, and 90 percent have less than 20.

  • Another building inspector sought for Calabash

    CALABASH—Town building inspector Stanley Dills’ wish-list item for the next budget year is another building inspector.

    At a preliminary budget workshop at town hall March 19, Dills outlined to town commissioners reasons why he thinks a second, beginning-level inspector is needed for the town building department.

    In a letter presented to commissioners, Stanley noted the amount of projected field inspections is expected to more than double in the next six months.

  • Sheriff: Fugitive 'terrorized' community

    CAROLINA SHORES—He was living in their midst, venturing out in the dark of night to burglarize homes while residents slept.

    According to the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office, Donald Edward Varner is responsible for more than seven months’ worth of break-ins and larcenies that occurred while he was living in a $203,000 rented house in Carolina Shores.

  • Board of adjustments talk tabled in Carolina Shores

    CAROLINA SHORES—The town planning and zoning board has tabled discussion about how to best compose the town board of adjustments.

    Town commissioners have asked P&Z members to serve a dual role as the board of adjustments, but concerns were discussed at the March 19 workshop.

    Members Jim Parsch, John Miner, Ruth Martin and Jim Mokrycki initially agreed the board of adjustments should be a separate entity.

    Parsch said it was his understanding the board of adjustments would review matters that had already been addressed by the P&Z board.

  • Former planning and zoning chairman dies

    CAROLINA SHORES—Ed Gillin, former chairman of the town planning and zoning board, died last Saturday at the age of 81.

    Tribute to Gillin was paid this week by colleagues who recalled his years of service for the town dating back to when it was still merged with the neighboring town of Calabash.

    “We have lost a very dear member of our community,” said former town commissioner Kathryn Powell, speaking at Monday’s meeting of the town planning and zoning board on which she presently serves.

  • Book recalls Bald Head Island police officer's shooting death eight years ago

    Next year will mark the 10th anniversary of Bald Head Island police officer Davina Buff Jones’ violent death from a single shot from her own gun while she was working an overnight shift near Old Baldy Lighthouse.

    Local authorities soon determined Jones’ bullet wound to the back of her head was self-inflicted.

    Her family, however, disagreed, arguing Jones was murdered, most likely at the hands of shady people involved in illegal drug dealings on the posh resort island that’s accessible only by boat.