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Today's News

  • Wacky-pedia strikes again

    This time, it’s official. I’m no longer relying on the too-often-unreliable Wikipedia to obtain “facts.”

    I’ve always heard it, but this time I believe it: People with too much time on their hands and too little common sense write many of these entries.

    A funny dialect difference sparked my latest foray into pedia-madness.

  • Southerners love fried green tomatoes, and fried red tomatoes, too

    Fried green tomatoes are one of my favorite summer foods. If you haven’t tried them, you’re in for a treat.

    Native to Mexico and Central America, it’s not clear how tomatoes came to the United States. Thomas Jefferson grew them in the 1780s and credited one of his neighbors with the introduction, but Harriott Pinckney Horry recorded a recipe, “To Keep Tomatoes for Winter Use” in 1770.

  • Work of three artists featured at Franklin Square Gallery

    “I love taking a piece of clay and creating something that will remind people of the Southport/Oak Island area,” said local potter Lynn Stanzlaus.

    The Oak Island resident is one of three featured artists at the New Members Show this month at Franklin Square Gallery, joining watercolorists William James and Prentiss Halladay.

    The scenery of Southport and the surrounding beaches and marshes has inspired local and regional artists, especially the three under the spotlight this month.

  • Arts & Entertainment

    Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • There's plenty to keep busy: Garden honey-do's

    My mother always said idle hands were the devil’s workshop among other things I tried to ignore as a kid. If you are looking for ways to avoid becoming a conduit for Beelzebub, I have several garden honey-do’s that will pay off handsomely.

    Crape myrtles that have finished their first round of blooms can usually be coaxed into an encore performance with just a little work.

  • Tips for pruning summer flowers, and controlling pests

    Pruning

    For additional flowering, deadheading some of your favorite flowers now may force them to bloom again in the fall. Light pruning may be performed for most landscape plants except those you expect to have blooms from next spring such as azaleas. Storm damaged tissue may make it necessary to make heavier pruning cuts than normal to repair broken, leaning or dangerous limbs.

  • Plant now for second summer vegetable crop

    As a result of one of our reader’s comments, the following information is provided on planting a second summer vegetable crop:

    The thermometer may be stuck on 90 degrees, but don’t let the summer heat beat you out of a second crop of fresh summer veggies. There is still time for another crop across much of North Carolina, especially along the coastal area.

  • Coastroad Hearth & Patio wins award

    Coastroad Hearth & Patio in Shallotte won a bronze award in the Residential Specialty category in the 29th annual Qualified Remodeler (QR) Master Design Awards Contest.

    Sponsored by Qualified Remodeler Magazine, the Master Design Awards recognizes outstanding achievement in residential remodeling projects in 22 categories.

  • Bright Ideas grant applications available from BEMC

    Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation’s annual Bright Ideas education grant program is in full swing for 2008.

    Teachers submitting applications before Aug. 28 will be entered into a drawing for a $500 Visa gift card. The drawing will be on Sept. 2 and the winning teacher will be notified on the day of the drawing. The winning teacher will also receive recognition on the Bright Ideas Web site, www.ncbrightideas.com.

  • The Pirate Years (1690 to 1720) at Ocean Isle Beach

    Between 1690 and 1720, pirates operated freely off Ocean Isle Beach—especially three pirates—Sam Bellamy, Stede Bonnet and Edward Teach.

    One pirate who looted more than 50 ships from his vessel “Whydah” was Bellamy, who was often called “Black Bellamy.”

    Bellamy’s pirate career came to an end on April 26, 1717, when a bad storm sunk his ship and nearly all onboard died including Bellamy.

    Another notorious pirate who attacked ships off Ocean Isle was Bonnet who was often called “The Gentleman Pirate.”