.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Patience is a key to academic success

    Patience is a lost virtue for many who live in our contemporary society. People of all ages, races and social economic backgrounds appear to be extremely impatient.

    The pursuit of pleasure is a constant pastime for many people. The concept of hard work and sacrifice seems to be a fading quest of years gone by.

  • One good idea helps save an important piece of local history

    It only takes one person to make a change in our community. When that person gets support of family, friends and others, a good idea can quickly grow into an important project.

  • District Court Docket

    The following cases were adjudicated over four days of District Criminal Court on May 14, 15, 16 and 19 in Bolivia.

    Wednesday, May 14

    Judge William F. Fairley presided over the following cases with prosecutor Gina Essey and courtroom clerks Michelle Warth and Jennifer Hearn:

    Paul McCray Babson, sell malt beverage to under 21, voluntarily dismissed.

    Stacey Chamber Barbee, improper equipment, costs.

    Patricia A. Batson, probation violation, admits, Brunswick County Jail 45 days active with 30 days credit for time served.

  • Surf fishing workshops set at aquarium

    It’s a beautiful time of year to take up fishing, particularly fishing in the surf—one of the most enjoyable ways to obtain the “catch of the day” and enjoy spending time at the beach.

    Some of my favorite beach memories of childhood are sitting with my family on the east end of Oak Island waiting for blues to catch our bait.

    Being a child, I didn’t have to worry about all the unglamorous parts of the adventure, and these days, I would have no idea how to get started. I’m sure others are the same way.

  • Whole grain brown rice a good source of vitamins and minerals

    The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend grains as the foundation of a healthy diet. In fact, the new Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid recommend at least three servings of whole grains daily, or making half your grain servings whole, with the other half coming from enriched or whole grains. Yet currently, less than 10 percent of Americans eat three servings daily and most eat an average of less than one serving per day.

  • Gourds make good homes for migrating martins

    SHALLOTTE—As Gerald Hewett stood in his back yard, a chortle arose from rows of gourds suspended on frames high overhead.

    “They’re getting fussy now,” Hewett said of the purple martin swallows that fly into his yard every spring to nest in the gourd houses he grew and crafted just for them.

    The 70-year-old said he’s been cultivating martin houses for 60 years, using gourds just like Native Americans did.

  • Turtle time

    SUNSET BEACH—Starting Sunday, hard-shelled marine reptiles will once again be the talk of the town as seasonal sea turtle programs launch at the beach.

    During the summer months, Sunset Beach’s “Turtle Time” educational and informational programs take place on Sunday nights on the island and on Wednesday afternoons at Ingram Planetarium.

    Weather permitting, the season’s first session is scheduled to launch at 7 p.m. this Sunday, June 1, in the parking lot of Sunset Properties, 419 S. Sunset Blvd. on the Sunset Beach island.

  • Arts & Entertainment

    Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15

  • Japanese beetle invasion imminent this summer

    No, you haven’t passed through a time warp where Zeros are swooping in to drop torpedo bombs on the U.S.S. Arizona. But, we do have a Japanese invasion that’s just getting started—the annual invasion of our gardens by the Japanese beetle.

    While these coppery-brown and green beetles have a voracious appetite for several hundred different plants, they really like to skeletonize the leaves of roses and grape vines. White or yellow roses are especially attractive.

  • Inquiring gardeners want to know about pests

    Poison ivy is an unwanted weed that shows up in residential home and commercial landscape projects. To sensitive individuals, the effect of poison ivy can be an interference with daily contracting activities. Some people are more sensitive than others to the effects of poison ivy; however, sensitivity can change from time to time so that someone who was not affected by it at one time can get a reaction at another time.