.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Community colleges to no longer admit illegal immigrants

    Based on advice from the Office of the Attorney General, the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) will no longer admit undocumented or illegal immigrants into curriculum degree programs.

    The NCCCS sought the help of the attorney general only a few months after a memorandum was issued in December 2007 mandating the 58 community colleges in the state to admit all undocumented individuals at an out-of-state tuition rate.

  • Community policing leads to four arrests in Supply break-in

    SUPPLY—Four suspects were arrested last Thursday and charged with an early morning break-in at the Provision Co. restaurant near Holden Beach.

    According to Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office detectives Capt. Gene Caison, an employee noticed a broken window, damaged items and a stolen flat screen TV when the employee went to work and reported the break-in.

    Sheriff’s deputies conducting surveillance in the area noticed the suspects loading the TV in the back of a car and arrested the suspects after a traffic stop.

  • Concerts on the Coast at Ocean Isle Beach kick off this weekend with 'Band of Oz'

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—Ocean Isle Beach’s Concerts on the Coast begins this Friday and continues through the end of August. The Band of Oz will play this Friday at 6:30 p.m., kicking off the 2008 concert series.

    Ocean Isle Beach’s Concerts on the Coast are in the parking lot of the Museum of Coastal Carolina every Friday from May 23-Aug. 29. Concerts begin at 6:30 p.m.

    The Concerts on the Coast events have been organized every summer since 2002 when the Ocean Isle Beach Property Owners Association provided sponsorship to jump-start the event.

  • Ocean Isle Beach named one of the best according to ASBPA

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—The American Shore and Beach Preservation Association (ASBPA) has named Ocean Isle Beach a winner of one of the 2008 Best Restored Beach Awards.

    According to a press release, Ocean Isle Beach began seeking funding for a federal restoration program after Hurricane Hugo hit in 1989. A capital reserve savings account was opened for the town’s portion of the funding. In 2001, coastal engineers began dredging sand from Shallotte Inlet, which not only extended beach renourishment two additional years, but also deepened the channel for boaters.

  • 'Summer Series in the Park' kicks off Thursday evening in Shallotte

    Shallotte alderman Walt Eccard has a vision for Shallotte. He hopes it will become a place where neighbors gather and spend time together.

    As an alderman and chair of the Downtown Shallotte Development Authority, Eccard, along with other town leaders and community volunteers, has been working to make that dream a reality.

    With a farmers’ market operational and growing, other time has been focused on generating community and business support for a 10-year vision plan for downtown Shallotte.

  • Realtors upset about Sea Trail ban on signs

    SUNSET BEACH—Real estate signs dotting the landscape at Sea Trail may soon be a thing of the past if the Sea Trail Masters Association has its way.

    But a group of real estate agents and property owners who met Monday at a Sea Trail clubhouse claimed the association’s recent mandate banning signs, effective this Friday, May 23, is discriminatory.

    “It’s very difficult to show property in a community that doesn’t allow signs,” said Sarah Lane, speaking at the gathering attended by about a dozen people at Maples Activity Center.

  • Tragic anniversaries often bring up difficult and painful memories

    An anniversary, by definition, is the yearly occurrence of a past event.

    For many, anniversaries are happy occasions. They are celebrated for marking important occasions in people’s lives. Couples celebrate relationship milestones by rejoicing in anniversaries of a first date, a first kiss or the day marital vows were taken.

  • Senior projects can have lasting effects on students' lives

    Back when I was a senior in high school—which was only six years ago—we didn’t have to do senior projects like the kids do these days. In fact, I can’t even remember doing a research paper at all that year. All I can remember from Mr. W’s English class is sitting in between my friends Liz and Aimee, and watching Martin Graham nearly pass out after putting an entire pack of those Listerine dissolving breath strips on his tongue. Trust me, he turned a shade of white I’d never seen before.

  • Save on gas, save on your mind

    Now that filling up the tank has become a major decision—food or fuel? Getting home or paying for a home?—I think many of us can appreciate ways to conserve gas and our sanity any way we can.

    Road hogs—you know who you are—now have an opportunity to downshift to a slower place to reduce fuel usage.

    The other day, I was crawling home at 50 mph as part of my new plan to decrease gas use and tick off everybody behind me in the process. It was kind of fun as long as nobody gets road rage.

  • Thanks to organizers for free events

    The time has never been better to get out and enjoy events and places in Brunswick County. Whether you’re a full-time resident, a part-time resident, or a vacationer, you’ll quickly see there is much to do in our community.

    While a number of businesses and entertainment groups put on some outstanding productions, some of the very best things to see and do here are events put on by a broad base of community volunteers. From theater productions and musicals to art shows and weekend festivals, from May until October, Brunswick County is hopping.