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Today's News

  • SOUTH ROUNDUP

    South Brunswick golfers win third straight match

    South Brunswick’s Dalton Gore shot a 38 and shared medalist honors with Whiteville’s Josh Kramer in Monday’s Waccamaw 1A/2A Conference golf match at Riegelwood Country Club.

    The Cougars continued to roll, winning their third consecutive league match by four strokes ahead of the Wolfpack. South Brunswick finished with 160 strokes, to 164 for Whiteville.

    South Brunswick is scheduled to meet Ashley and Hoggard in a match Thursday at Beau Rivage in Wilmington and host Topsail March 25.

  • West Brunswick netters fall to two perennial powerhouses

    West Brunswick’s boys’ tennis team lost a pair of matches to perennial powerhouses last week.

    West fell 9-0 on March 11 to North Myrtle Beach.

    West also fell 9-0 to perennial conference champion Hoggard on March 13.

    “The kids got a chance first hand to see strong they really are,” said West coach Bob Bell.

    Of the 11 active players on the Trojan tennis roster, all but two are either sophomores or freshman.

  • South, North players named to Waccamaw conference team

    South Brunswick and North Brunswick had a combined 13 athletes picked for first-team All-Waccamaw 1A/2A Conference honors.

    The Cougars had eight chosen, including five from its league-winning wrestling team, while the Scorpions had five.

    The South Brunswick wrestlers chosen were Jeromy Roundtree, Charlie Martin, Sammy Roundtree, Jonathan Marvin and Rick Logan.

    The Cougars’ Ryan Waldrep and Ervin Hall made first team in boys’ basketball with Joey Hines and Edward McNeill voted to the second team.

  • Brunswick Wildlife: Got Attitude?

    You want attitude? Pound for pound—actually ounce for ounce—the Carolina wren is the Lower Cape Fear’s bird with the most attitude. The wren is only exceeded at times by an occasional mockingbird or a visiting New York cab driver.

    The mockingbird arguably has the baddest attitude because, when defending its territory, it sometimes attacks people, its own reflection in a window, and other birds. And who hasn’t seen a mocker terrorize a cat?

  • More subpoenaed documents released

    County attorney Huey Marshall has released to the Brunswick Beacon more subpoenaed documents related to the federal investigation of Brunswick County Sheriff Ronald E. Hewett. Marshall released 55 pages of subpoeaned documents Thursday morning. For more information read next week's issue of the Beacon.

  • This traditional Irish comfort food is easy in the slow cooker

    What's the national dish of Ireland? Corned beef and cabbage, you say? Since March has undoubtedly become “Irish Awareness Month,” I thought it would be fun to explore the truth behind yet another Irish myth.

  • 'Beyond Bellamy's Crossing' a labor of love for Supply man

    Herbert Pittman of Supply has been around the world, and seen and done things in days gone by his grandchildren and great-grandchildren may have never known about.

    He has boxes of pictures from his days in the U.S. Air Force on the beaches of Guam, the marketplaces of Turkey, the deserts of Libya and the rice paddies of Southeast Asia.

    He has official records from his military career and mementoes of his family and job that he’s saved over the past 50 years. He wants his four children, their children and their children’s children to know about his life.

  • Lawns celebrating the 'green'

    St. Patrick’s Day is next Monday, but some of our lawns are already “wearin’ a bit ‘o the green” because of some warm days. This move out of dormancy means right now is the wrong time to stress your lawn with fertilizers or weed control products. Maybe you can just save some of that green beer for your grass.

  • Gardening tips for the month of March

    Look at what is blooming now! The Brunswick County Botanical Garden is starting to show color. Our saucer magnolia is blooming and the forsythia in the woods has peaked. Some of our old bulbs are “poking” through the ground with promises of color soon.

  • Are you a gardener who has ever wondered how much your plant is worth?

    As we all start looking for plants as spring approaches, the following may be of some help:

    Many gardeners are addicted to visiting garden centers and nurseries and greenhouses in search of plants, trees, shrubs, annuals and houseplants. They shop and compare prices but are never quite sure what a plant is worth. The problem is some sort of valuation is placed on the plant. We try to figure out the worth or value of the plant in comparison to another source of supply. To some extent, that is a reasonable approach.