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Today's News

  • Understanding cholesterol risks

    High cholesterol risks are not usually immediate. The damage accumulates over years and decades-high cholesterol in your 20s and 30s can take its toll in your 50s and 60s. Because the effects take time, many people don’t feel real urgency in treating it. They feel they can just deal with it later.

  • N.C. Community College BioNetwork to offer classes at Brunswick Community College

    Courses made possible through a N.C. Community College BioNetwork grant are reshaping the future in Brunswick County, according to Karen Ladley, the school’s public information officer.

  • Dog Story: A life transformed

    This is the story of a dog—a small red tick hound who, along with a lot of other dogs, strayed from home and wound up on adoption row at the Brunswick County Animal Shelter.

    It’s also the story of Janie Withers and Gail Colwell, two members of Paws-Ability, a nonprofit group devoted to raising money for assorted animal causes in Brunswick County.

    Withers, of Ocean Isle Beach and a founder of the group, frequently visits the shelter and has rescued a few animals in her lifetime.

  • How to grow early vegetables

    Over the years, a number of techniques have been used to produce early vegetable crops. Many of these “tricks of the trade” were originated by growers and universities. By using one or more of these “tricks,” you can increase your annual vegetable yield. Check out these seven tips for growing vegetables early and getting a jump on the rest of the growers:

    Multiple plantings

  • Winter gardening tips

    The window is still open for pruning your shrubs and trees. Now is the time to cut back your pampas grass to within 12-inches of the ground.

    Use hedge clippers because of the vastness of the grass clump and wear gloves as the leaves have sharp edges. Make sure you remove the dead leaves and debris from the center of the clump so sunlight can get through to start the spring growing process. Established clumps of pampas grass can be divided and planted elsewhere in your landscape.

  • Riding the temperature roller coaster

    The temperature roller coaster continues here in southeastern North Carolina with nights in the teens followed a few days later with days in the 70s. While you won’t find me complaining about the days in the 70s, the erratic temperatures do create problems for our garden plants.

    Gardenias in some locations have been injured. If the warmth continues, you’ll see roses and lots of other plants starting to grow. And, the warmth really creates great conditions for winter weeds in lawns.

  • Republicans race to the White House

    MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.—With the South Carolina GOP presidential primary just days away, candidates vying for the Republican presidential nomination sparred last Thursday night at the First-in-the-South GOP presidential debate.

    No Republican has ever won the presidency without first winning the South Carolina primary, debate panelist Carl Cameron told the candidates, whose demeanors already suggested they understood the importance of capturing the key state.

  • Brunswick Republicans volunteer at S.C. debate

    MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.—While Mount Myrtle, the 1,000-ton, 20-foot sand likeness of the Republican presidential candidates drew most of the attention of passersby, Helen Pannullo and her husband John were busy volunteering for the day’s events leading up to the First-in-the-South Republican presidential primary debate last Thursday.

  • Democratic debate slated for Myrtle Beach, S.C.

    The Congressional Black Caucus Institute will host the Democratic Presidential Primary Debate before the Jan. 26 South Carolina Democratic primary.

    The debate kicks off at 8 p.m. Monday, Jan. 21, at the Palace Theater in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

    The media sponsors are CNN, CNN International and CNN Radio. Wolf Blitzer will moderate the event with CNN correspondents John King and Suzanne Malveaux will serve as panelists.

  • Additional subpoenas issued in sheriff case

    At least seven Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office employees have been subpoenaed to testify before a federal grand jury. The subpeonas were issued last Thursday, county attorney Huey Marshall said.

    When contacted at his office Tuesday, Brunswick County Sheriff Ronald E. Hewett referred questions about receiving a subpoena to his attorney, W. Douglas Parsons.

    But Hewett said he was, and would continue to be at work.