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Today's News

  • BCC offers high school firefighting course

    According to Velva Jenkins, Dean of Continuing Education and Workforce Development, Brunswick County is one of the fastest growing communities in North Carolina and the nation, and with that growth comes the need for more emergency responders, including firefighters.

    To help meet the demand, Brunswick Community College is now helping students get started in a career with fire services before they graduate high school.

    BCC started a new Firefighting Technology course on Jan. 29. Students ranging from 16 to 18 years old are eligible for the five-month course.

  • BCC announces honor roll, dean's list

    Brunswick Community College has announced its honor roll list and dean’s list for the fall 2007 semester.

    To qualify for the honor roll list, students must maintain a 3.0-3.49 GPA for the semester.

    Honor Roll

  • BCC continues its Black History Month events

    BCC's Feb. 12 Black History month event featured local business owners ranging from Yolanda Rogers and Wanna Whitted, co-owners of GiGi’s shoe boutique, to Training Wheels founder Tami Easter.

    Joe and Moe Auto Service co-owner Joe Stanley and Black Pages USA President Gerry McCants also shared their advice to help motivate everyone in the audience to succeed and follow their dreams.

    After the presenters spoke, the floor was opened for a question and answer session.

    All agreed hard work and determination are the keys to success.

  • Soulful Sanctuary

    With the afternoon sun beaming down, Lonzie Bryant stood outside Cedar Grove Missionary Baptist Church and basked in the warmth and history.

    The 62-year-old church trustee can recall his childhood, when a more primitive structure preceded the two-story brick church building in the African-American community on Cedar Grove Road.

    He remembers homemade pews, no central heat in winter and no air conditioning or fans in summer, when windows were lifted to let some air in.

    “Most people came to church with a mule and cart,” he said.

  • Sweet Celia

    Celia is a full-grown gray tiger-and-white tabby who loves to dip her paws in the water can and lick your hands. To see her, call Cat Tails at 253-1375 or visit its Web site at www.cattails.org. You can visit Celia, as well as all the other cats and kittens available for adoption, at Cat Tails in the Corner Stone center at 6622 Beach Drive in Ocean Isle Beach. Visiting hours are 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays and 1-3 p.m. Sundays. Other hours are by appointment. Cat Tails is also desperate for volunteers.

  • After the holiday plant care

    Poinsettia’s keeping quality depends on several factors. Many home gardeners have no trouble keeping a poinsettia looking good through the winter, but bringing it into “flower” in subsequent years is a challenge for the best of gardeners. They are still considered actively growing even now and will need water, sunlight, and fertilizing through February.

    Pruning Camellias

  • Pre-spring lawn care, Part I

    EDITOR'S NOTE: Part 1 of a two-part series on Lawn Care

    Now is a great time for planning weed control in your lawn. There are two different kinds of weeds to consider. Winter weeds will be discussed first.

    The majority of winter weeds are annual weeds. They grow during the winter, flower and produce seeds, and die during the first hot spell in the spring.

    Now is a good time to spot spray with a herbicide such as Weed-B-Gone for Southern Lawns or Speed Zone Southern. There are several other products that will work.

  • This time of year is garden transition time

    I don’t know about all of you, but my garden really starts to irritate me this time of year. Things just aren’t happening fast enough. I’m tired of looking at the bare stems of the deciduous trees and shrubs. The ornamental grasses have received their annual buzz cut, so they’re not exactly the Jessica Simpson of the horticultural world. The daffodil bulbs are just getting started. My severely pruned buddleias are several months away from attracting a butterfly.

  • Teachers may have changes in salary payouts

    Beginning as early as the 2008-2009 school year, Brunswick County Schools’ teachers may have to do some extra financial budgeting.

    Freyja Cahill, executive financial officer, said the IRS has been restructuring deferred compensation plans since 2005, but is implementing new rules the school system must follow.

    School employees that do no work during the summer months currently have the option of receiving paychecks for either 10 or 12 months.

  • Sheriff probe taking too long

    To the editor: There appears to be something wrong here. Since early summer of last year, I have watched and read the news about a grand jury inquiry of Brunswick County Sheriff Ronald Hewett.

    Is this a witch-hunt? We are informed the grand jury is totally secretive.

    How does the public know if this could be just a political action, or some “bad person” who is trying to get even with the sheriff, for doing his job?