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Today's News

  • Offshore oil drilling opponents ask county commissioners to reconsider resolution

    BOLIVIA — A Brunswick County Board of Commissioners resolution advocating seismic surveys and offshore drilling development brought a host of opponents to Monday’s commission meeting.

    The resolution, passed July 6, said the board supports seismic surveying in the Atlantic Ocean to promote future offshore drilling efforts off the coast. It states there is a lack of demonstrated harm to marine mammal populations or coastal communities and effective mitigation measures used by the geological and geophysical industry protect individual animals.

  • School board continues discussion on day treatment program site

     BOLIVIA — For the last six months, officials have discussed the possibility of implementing a day treatment program in Brunswick County Schools.

    Those discussions continued at the Brunswick County School Board’s operations committee meeting Tuesday, July 21, at the district’s administrative offices.

    At their regular meeting in early July, board members approved Bolivia Elementary School as a potential site for the program on the condition that staff explore other options throughout the community before Tuesday’s meeting.

  • Project Lazarus consultant confident in county’s ability to combat drug problem

     BOLIVIA — Anne Thomas has traveled across the Tar Heel State for the last five years as a consultant for communities trying to combat prescription painkiller misuse and abuse.

    Thomas, who also works with Community Care of North Carolina, works with Project Lazarus for those seeking to establish the program in their communities.

    She has assisted the project’s Brunswick County Coalition since Project Lazarus founder Fred Brazon brought community leaders together last summer to address the prescription painkiller problem locally.

  • District 8 Senate update

    By Sen. Bill Rabon

    Guest Columnist

    Editor’s note: The Beacon has tried for 16 weeks to reach Sen. Bill Rabon by phone and email for comment about Senate Bill 215, which lists him as the bill’s primary sponsor and calls for the state “to abolish the office of coroner in Brunswick County.” Senate Bill 215 was reported favorable to the Senate’s standing committee on health care and re-referred to the Senate Judiciary I Committee on March 31.

  • District 17 House update

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    Last week in the North Carolina House of Representatives, the speaker appointed the committee to negotiate the budget, we passed a bill to make amusement rides and zip lines safer, and we continued discussing the differences between the House and Senate budgets.

  • District court docket

    The following cases were adjudicated over four days of District Criminal Court on July 6, 7, 9 and 10 in Bolivia.

    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDF, Brunswick County Detention Facility; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Correction.

     

    Monday, July 6

    Judge Jerry A. Jolly presided over the following cases with prosecutor Courtney Sanford and courtroom clerks Courtney Graham and Kimberly Register:

  • Living the Beatitudes is not for the faint of heart

    Whether we find our home on the mountaintops of life or on the plains of ordinary stuff, we receive the same message. Whether we are actively prestigious in our nation’s governmental system or arduously putting one step in front of another to meet daily challenges, the message is repeated. Blessed are the peacemakers. Happy are the peacemakers. Holy are the peacemakers.

  • Moving this summer? Protect yourself by planning ahead

    By Attorney General Roy Cooper

    Guest Columnist

    Moving is hard work, and many of the millions of Americans who move between May and September hire professionals to help. If you’re planning to move this summer, learn what steps you can take to make sure it goes smoothly.

  • Need to reform welfare system

    By Congressman David Rouzer

    Guest Columnist

    In 1996, a Republican-led Congress and a Democratic president signed a welfare reform bill that required recipient’s work. It was a good bill that helped move millions off welfare and into productive jobs.

  • You decide: How can a business stay afloat?

    By Dr. Mike Walden

    Guest Columnist

    Operating a business is tough. Meeting payroll, hiring qualified workers, attracting buyers and complying with regulations are just a few of the challenges faced by business owners. Statistics show 44 percent of new businesses shut down within three years. Opening a business is no guarantee it will be a success.