.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Ground pearls plague turfgrasses

     Ground pearls are native scale insects that attach themselves to the roots of turfgrasses and suck the life of them. Centipede is especially susceptible, but all grasses except bahia are negatively affected. The “pearl” moniker comes from the cyst stage that looks much like a granule of polymer-coated fertilizer such as Osmocote. This time of year you may see the pinkish-red females crawling around on the surface waiting for a hookup with the tiny, fly-like males. Once they mate the females burrow back into the soil and lay eggs to start another generation.

  • Local strawberries

     Local fresh strawberries are a real treat this time of year. The growers have had quite a season this year with the Mother Nature. With the really warm weather in late February, some of us were lucky to get early berries. Then the cold weather in March slowed things down. While the April rain was appreciated, it too slowed the ripening and picking. According to one local grower I spoke with, if the weather continues to be favorable, we will have berries through May. 

  • Looking beyond the shadow of doubt

     So often we have allowed doubt to cast a shadow on our faith. We let it tinge credence with incredulity, casting the gloom of uncertainty upon the grace of certitude. This causes distress and dismay to dog our steps and burden our spirits. We are shaken, but not to the core. To try to dismiss doubt summarily — banishing it to the darkest corner we can find — does no good. Somehow it surfaces when we least expect it and we are, once again, ill at ease.

  • Looking beyond the shadow of doubt

     So often we have allowed doubt to cast a shadow on our faith. We let it tinge credence with incredulity, casting the gloom of uncertainty upon the grace of certitude. This causes distress and dismay to dog our steps and burden our spirits. We are shaken, but not to the core. To try to dismiss doubt summarily — banishing it to the darkest corner we can find — does no good. Somehow it surfaces when we least expect it and we are, once again, ill at ease.

  • It really is possible to make outstanding ribs in your oven

     When it comes to outdoor cooking, many of us are at a considerable disadvantage. During the warmer, prime time cook-out season, those with outdoor grills and smokers will be busy heating up the charcoal, stuffing firewood into smokers or, like most, just turning the knob on their gas grill.

     

  • Leland man accused of making meth in home

    A Leland man is accused of making meth in his home.

    Tyler Justin Demas, 33, of Blueray Drive was arrested May 3 after a joint investigation by the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office’s Vice-Narcotics Unit and North Carolina Community Corrections.

    Demas was charged with two counts of possessing or distributing a meth precursor, manufacturing methamphetamine and misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia.

  • 79-year-old man accused of sex crimes with child

    A 79-year-old Southport man is accused of sex crimes involving a child younger than 16.

    Rubin Smith Curtis of Long Beach Road was arrested May 3 and charged with two counts of indecent liberties with a child.

    Warrants show one of the incidents took place between Oct. 1 and 31, 2013, and the other between Feb. 1, and May 1, 2014.

    Curtis was booked in the Brunswick County Detention Facility on May 3 and released the next day on $50,000 bail.

  • Leland man accused of possessing child pornography

    A Leland man is being held on $3 million bail after authorities discovered child pornography in his possession.

    Michael Hunter Cook, 34, of Cottagefield Lane was arrested at his home May 3 after a joint investigation between the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations, sheriff’s office spokeswoman Emily Flax said.

  • K-3 class sizes to change under HB 13

    BELVILLE — North Carolina public schools, including those in Brunswick County, will see a reduction in class sizes for grades K-3 come fall, though not as drastically as first expected.

    Signed by Gov. Roy Cooper on April 27, House Bill 13 is touted as a compromise that continues reducing elementary school class sizes over the next two years while addressing local concerns about special subject-area teachers in the classroom.

    Brunswick County Schools will begin to phase in the mandatory class-size reductions in grades K-3 during the 2017-18 school year.

  • North Brunswick High School teams complete their ECC seasons

    Staff Report

    LELAND — East Duplin beat North Brunswick 8-4 and won the East Central Conference softball championship May 4.

    The Panthers finished with 10 hits, four of them in the first inning as they took a 3-0 lead.

    A triple and a wild pitch led to the first of four runs in the fourth inning and a 7-0 lead.

    The Scorpions scored their four runs in the final inning. Singles by Kerrin Mailhot, Kelsey Ray and Aliah Johnson led to three runs. The fourth run scored on a wild pitch.