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Today's News

  • Salvias: Tough plants for a tough climate

    By Sam Marshall

     

    Over the years, salvia, also referred to as sages, have been steadily growing in popularity. And why not? For the low-maintenance gardener, salvias offer an excellent addition to a coastal garden. Able to withstand the heat, the humidity, drought, and coming in a variety of colors and sizes, salvias add fragrance and beauty to any home landscape that lasts well into the fall months.

     

    Growing salvias

  • Don’t get burned by freezer burn

    So here’s the question: Is it safe to eat freezer burned food?
    In this column I frequently talk about the difference between the quality and safety of food. When it comes to freezer burn, it’s a quality thing. While safe to eat, the quality of freezer-burned food may be poor.

  • The feline who feared the couch

    This appointment was going to take a while.

    Mrs. Smith (not her real name) calmly stroked her purring feline as she continued raising her voice toward me.

    “I don’t care what you think, Dr. Ward. I change her litter box quite enough! Frieda tells me when it’s time to clean the poo-poo pail and I empty it promptly.”

  • What is this mystery plant?

    By John Nelson

    Botanists are always looking for interesting places, because that’s where the interesting plants are. The thing is, just about any kind of place is going to be interesting to a botanist in one way or another. Why, just this past weekend I was botanizing out in the countryside near our beautiful Edisto River: it was the middle of nowhere, and I spied a wonderful place for a botanist to spend some time: a “loading deck.”

  • District Court docket for June 26, 27, 28 and 30

    The following cases were adjudicated over four days of District Criminal Court on June 26, 27, 28 and 30 in Bolivia.

    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDF, Brunswick County Detention Facility; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Correction.

     

    Monday, June 26

    Judge Pauline Hankins presided over the following cases with prosecutor Patrick Murphy and courtroom clerk Kimberly Gonzalez:

  • Shallotte names new police chief

    By Janine Piburn

    Beacon Correspondent

    SHALLOTTE — Shallotte’s new police chief was sworn in to office at the regular meeting of the Shallotte Board of Aldermen on July 5.

    Scott Branning is new to the position, but not to the force. He’s been with the department since August 1997 after starting his law enforcement career in Roxboro in 1993. He worked his way up through the ranks from patrol and has been ranked as a sergeant, lieutenant, captain and major.

  • You decide: Has North Carolina’s economy taken a U-turn?

    By Dr. Mike Walden

    Guest Columnist

    When driving, U-turns can be tricky. The driver often has to turn against oncoming traffic, and, if the turn is at a light, the driver hopes the turn can be made before the light changes to red. Even if the turn is successfully made, the driver must quickly accelerate to merge into traffic. Many times illegal U-turns are made, which is dangerous because oncoming traffic doesn’t necessarily expect the turn to be attempted.

  • Crew helps clean, create biking trail in Brunswick Nature Park

    WINNABOW — Living in Brunswick County means living in a flat marshland, so anyone wanting to take a mountain bike for a spin will most likely take their rough ride on a man-made trail.

    That’s exactly what the North Carolina Youth Conservation Corps provided last week when it kicked off its fifth summer season by deploying a crew to Brunswick Nature Park, wrapping up its three weeks of work throughout the state. The park in Winnabow is a North Carolina Coastal Land Trust protected property.

  • Shallotte police seek Wal-Mart shoplifter

    Shallotte police are asking for the public’s assistance to find a woman who shoplifted about $500 in items from Wal-Mart last week.

    Detective Cory McLamb said the woman, described as a white with a medium to large build, came into the store about 1 p.m. June 30 and stole two flat-screen TVs, Charmin toilet paper, an unspecified brand of paper towels and an unnamed brand of dog food.

    Anyone with information is asked to call McLamb at 754-6008.

  • Man charged in attempted Oak Island kidnapping

    Police arrested a man accused of trying to steal a vehicle with a pregnant mother and child inside in Oak Island.

    Joseph “Joe” Dylan Dreisonstok, 24, of Wilmington was arrested Monday morning and faces charges of assault on a female, attempted larceny and larceny of a motor vehicle, Brunswick County Detention Facility records show.

    Warrants were served on Dreisonstok in the July 1 incident on South Middleton Avenue, according to an Oak Island Police Department Facebook post.

    Dreisonstok remains jailed on $100,000 bail.