.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Play for Pink continues Lockwood tradition

     Lockwood Folly has been hosting fundraisers for breast cancer since 1997. The Play for Pink ladies golf tournament will take place Oct. 23.  The men’s Play for Pink golf tournament is on Oct. 29. The annual Play for Pink card party and luncheon took place on April 4.

  • Hill, Napolitano named conference players of week in college football

     

    Video of Nick Napolitano: 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdbSVsxg5-s

    Staff Repor

    Former West Brunswick football players Alfy Hill ad Nick Napolitano had key plays for their teams in college football over the weekend.

    Hill, a senior defensive end, was one of the top defensive players for Winston-Salem State University in its 38-7 home victory Saturday, Sept. 6, against UNC Pembroke.

  • Sunset Beach to mull twin lakes options

    Sunset Beach Town Council will review alternatives proposed by town staff for maintenance of the twin lakes on Shoreline Drive West at its monthly meeting Monday, Sept. 8.

    The town does not own the lakes and is not legally responsible to maintain the lakes for stormwater retention.

    Town staff has developed three options and recommends one of those options — to allow full cost of maintenance to revert back to the property owner or conservation group and encourage them to apply for available grants.

  • Auditorium director loses house, dogs in weekend fire

    A house fire Saturday afternoon in the Ash area has left a couple without a home.

    Waccamaw Fire and Rescue Chief Jason Coveyou said smoke was pouring from the house at 3829 Ash Little River Road upon his department’s arrival at the fire reported at 4:41 p.m. Sept. 6.

    Passersby who noticed smoke coming from the house on their way to Myrtle Beach, S.C., reported the fire.

  • Fall vegetable gardens extend the growing season

    By Patti Schleig

    Master Gardener Volunteer

     

    In a climate suitable for three-season gardening, North Carolina is a great place for gardeners. For those who truly love gardening, I guess you could say it’s utopia. Well, I shouldn’t get carried away, as this utopia includes problems with soil, weather that can change from hour to hour, and insects like none I’ve seen before in gardening. Despite all this, the arrival of fall gives us a break from the headaches of summer and is a great time to reclaim your yard.

  • Get into heart healthy cooking

    During the month of October, the N.C. Cooperative Extension service will be offering a series of classes on heart healthy cooking. Each week will feature a topic related to heart disease and a related food demonstration. Obviously, all of the foods and recipes will be heart healthy. The classes will be held on Thursdays from 1:30to 3:30 p.m. at the Brunswick County Extension Training Center, 25 Referendum Drive at the Government Center in Bolivia.

  • How to MOVE(R) memory

    By Katie McKee

    Brunswick County 4-H Agent

     

  • The versatility and speed of the classic French sauté

    Many of us have cooked meat in a hot pan lightly covered in olive oil and then deglazed the pan with either a rich beef or chicken stock or our favorite white or red wine. This classic French sauté method is credited to Pierre Franey, whose series of “60-Minute Gourmet” cookbooks taught a generation of Americans about the versatility and speed of this classic technique.

  • Forgiveness is our detour from the path of destruction

    Usually, I am not eager to enter political conversations. I drag my feet because I know my information is sketchy at best and ill-informed at worst. Without knowledge of the whole story gained and gleaned from worthy sources, I fear expounding on facts that are not demonstrably accurate. The old adage encouraging one to be silent lest one’s ignorance becomes apparent impels my muteness.

  • Elephants may be better drug detectors than dogs

    Elephants have long been known for their prehensile proboscis. Researchers recently discovered that tucked in that trunk is perhaps the planet’s most sensitive sniffer. Newly published genomic data concludes that elephants possess five times more smelling genes than humans and more than twice as many as dogs. This leads to the logical conclusion that you may spot an elephant snorting through your luggage the next time you check in at the airport.