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Columns

  • No shortage of Christmas spirit in Brunswick County

    There are truly more holiday events in Brunswick County than we can cover in a single season. If there are so many we physically can’t get to them all, we’re certain the same is true for Beacon readers. But rest assured we try to cover as many as we can so as many readers as possible can take in the sights, too.

  • On Campus with BCC: Achieve a healthier lifestyle

    By Dr. Susanne Adams

    Guest Columnist

    North Carolina is home to 58 community colleges — all institutions focused on meeting the unique demands of their service areas. However, in my more than 32 years serving the North Carolina Community College System, I have encountered no institution that addresses so thoroughly the health and fitness needs posed by a large, rural county as well as Brunswick Community College. Simply, no community college in North Carolina boasts a campus facility such as the Dinah E. Gore Fitness & Aquatics Center.

  • Plenty to cherish before, during and after Thanksgiving

    First off this week, I need to give a belated thank you to everyone who helped make the Beacon’s sixth annual Holiday Happenings show at Shallotte Middle School on Nov. 12 a smashing success.

  • You decide: Will Trump economic policies work?

    By Dr. Mike Walden

    Guest Columnist

    The voting is over, and we now know Donald J. Trump will take office next year as the 45th President of the United States in January.

    A big part of the presidential political campaigns centered on the economy, with candidates talking about boosting economic growth, creating jobs and improving pay.

    With Mr. Trump the winner, all eyes will be on the policies he will promote to achieve these goals.

  • If Leland and Belville ever find a way to work together, I’ll eat my shoe

    A couple weeks back, I got some news I thought I’d never hear.

    I was told officials from Leland and Belville had come to an agreement to partner on putting an ABC store within Leland’s town limits.

    Right then when I heard the words “Leland” and “Belville” and “agreement” I should have trusted my instincts and known it was too good to be true.

  • Gratefulness offered in advance for driving safely

    Most of our newsroom and many of our other coworkers will be among the estimated 2 million Carolinians AAA estimated will journey 50 miles or more from home this Thanksgiving. The nonprofit motorists’ group defines the travel period as Wednesday, Nov. 23, to Sunday, Nov. 27.

  • Leland Causeway Bridge project completed ahead of schedule

    By Karen Eason Collette

    Guest Columnist

    Performing road construction on a heavily traveled highway is like remodeling a house while you’re still living in it. Although the process can be stressful and inconvenient at times, the final product is rewarding.

    This sentiment is now being shared by thousands of Wilmington and Leland area commuters who navigated through the Leland Causeway Bridge project, one of the biggest and most ambitious projects in the history of our region.

  • Support your local retailers

    By Andy Ellen

    Guest Columnist

    Hurricane Matthew hit North Carolina harder than anyone could have imagined.

    Millions of North Carolinians were affected either by wind damage, power outages or flooding.

    While none of us ever want any disaster to occur, fortunately, when they do happen, they seem to bring out the best in people.

  • An extraordinary experience, courtesy of kind readers

    Since my last column, some of the sting from this year’s World Series has abated. The series went to seven games and ended in defeat at Cleveland for my beloved Cleveland Indians. It pitted my team, now heading into its 69th year without a title, against the Chicago Cubs, whose 108-year drought finally ended. Before the series ended, they were the two Major League Baseball franchises with the longest championship droughts.

  • You decide: Where will we live?

    By Dr. Mike Walden

    Guest Columnist

    Less than 50 years ago in 1970, North Carolina was still a rural state. More than half (54 percent) of the state’s residents lived in rural areas. In fact, at that time, only five states — Vermont, West Virginia, North Dakota, South Dakota and Mississippi — had a higher percentage of their population living in rural counties.