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Columns

  • Support and appreciate the good in our community

    Before I get too deep into my column this week, I want to ask: Has anyone else noticed how lovely downtown Shallotte looks right now, especially on Main Street along the river?

  • 'Dueling ceremonies' familiar Memorial Day scenario in Calabash

    Calabash has to be the most patriotic town in Brunswick County, if not North Carolina and the entire United States.

    For the past decade, as best my not-so-baby (boomer) memory strains to serve me, I have covered Memorial Day ceremonIES in the Seafood Capital.

    I stress the plural part because, as most Calabash Seafood Capitalists know by now, the town traditionally has two, even three, ceremonies paying tribute to our fallen heroes, veterans and active-duty service members alike.

    This is an absolutely good thing.

  • How Accountable Care Organizations affect Medicare beneficiaries

    By Jennifer Prince Sherman

    Guest Columnist

     

    If you are on Medicare, you may have recently been contacted by an Accountable Care Organization and asked for access to your health records and other Medicare information.

  • From the North Carolina state legislature

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    Week two of the short session began early with a Monday, May 19, 4 p.m. session. This was in order to read in dozens of new bills and get the week off to a fast start. Many meetings were held with our colleagues to discuss the upcoming bills. This included tax issues, as well as energy, education and young offender’s legislation.

  • District 8 Senate update

    By Sen. Bill Rabon

    Guest Columnist

    The North Carolina Senate reconvened for the short session last week and there is no shortage of work to be done.

    The primary purpose of the short session is to make necessary adjustments to the budget so government spending will continue to benefit citizens and improve efficiency.

    Last July, we passed a two-year budget that invested in core services, streamlined state government, strengthened public education and helped grow North Carolina’s economy while cutting taxes for all North Carolinians.

  • Owning your opinion a risk worth taking

    I got a letter to the editor late last month regarding a primary election candidate. It was worth publishing and provided documentation, except it lost legitimacy for being unsigned. Well, it was signed “Concerned Citizen for Truth and Dignity in Elections, (I May be old but I am a good researcher!), Supply, N.C.” but I couldn’t find anyone by that name in any directory at my disposal.

  • Florence Bruce at age 100

    By Verniece E. Stanley

    Guest Columnist

    The first half of the 19th century, freed blacks had increasing difficulties surviving.

    Florence Bruce was born in Bolivia on May 22, 1914. She can tell how her father got the land. The land deeds were kept by grandparents and given to him to keep as a young man. The land was located near a plantation. The owners were no longer living there. Most of the soil was good for farming. Farming was a way of life with a family.

  • From the state legislature

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    Although the General Assembly kicked off last week, things began to heat up before the gavel came down at noon Wednesday, May 14. There were various committees and meetings all over Raleigh. Of course, most of them were in the Legislative Building and the Legislative Office Building. About 300 bills were filed which covered a variety of subjects, including taxes, education, transportation and local issues.

  • General Assembly report

    By Sen. Bill Rabon

    Guest Columnist

    Last week, the North Carolina Senate convened the 2014 Short Session. The new Senate members were recognized and seated on opening day, Wednesday, May 14. They are Jeff Jackson from Charlotte, Joyce Kraweic from Kernersville and Terry Van Duyn from Asheville. Inductees from the NASCAR Hall of Fame were also recognized that day. We finished up tasks from the interim committees. We are now working in standing committees. We are off to a fast start and are excited about our plans for this session.

  • From the state legislature

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    As you are reading this, the North Carolina General Assembly will be beginning the short session. We will convene at high noon Wednesday, May 14. There are several reasons it’s called the short session. They include the length of about six to eight weeks as compared with the six-month session last year, the limited number of bills we can consider, and that we are adjusting to the two-year budget rather than passing a new one. We have been assured by the Speaker that he plans to make it a “short” short session.