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Columns

  • An extended editor’s note in lieu of a lengthy column

    As some readers may know already, the Beacon isn’t printed here in Shallotte. Since our press shut down in 2011, the fine folks at The News & Record in Greensboro have been helping us bring our print edition to readers each week via the U.S. Postal Service and more than 50 racks we have in and around Brunswick County.

    By the end of this month, Greensboro’s press will have shut down as well, shifting its duties — including the printing of the Beacon — to its neighboring newspaper’s press at The Winston-Salem Journal.

  • Two minutes on Tuesdays meant so much

    By Mike O'Hare

    Guest Columnist

    Since retiring to Brunswick County five years ago, my wife and I have been lucky to have been part of a volunteer program that has us visiting people each Tuesday.

  • You decide: Are the humanities still useful in a tech world?

    By Dr. Mike Walden

    Guest Columnist

    My wife is part of a shrinking group of people. She is low-tech! Yes, she has a smart phone and a tablet, compliments of me, but she reluctantly uses them. Many days she forgets to turn them on, and even if they’re on, she’ll forget to check for messages. Rather than texting or emailing, she still likes writing letters, making phone calls or, better yet, talking to people in person.

  • We’re willing to help you help others — if you let us

    Hello again! Last week, we ran out of room for my column.

    Actually, as Beacon editor, I made the call that what other people had to say on the opinion pages of last week’s edition was more important and timelier than what I had to say.

  • A Nomad’s Notes: ‘Hi, I’m a journalist, I like to make a big deal about everything…’

    On Friday, Sept. 1, the Leland Police Department posted on its public official Facebook page about an incident when one of its officers parked in a handicapped spot in town without authorization to do so.

  • On Campus with BCC: Foundation celebrates 35 years of creating opportunities for students

    By Dr. Susanne Adams

    Guest Columnist

    Brunswick Community College has a long tradition of providing quality educational opportunities for its students. The opportunities available through curriculum and continuing education programs both on-line and in the classroom at BCC allow our students to contribute to the growth and development of Brunswick County. Graduates leave our campus ready to enter the workplace or pursue further education that will benefit them individually and the community collectively as many continue to live and work in the region.

  • District 17 House update

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    Last week in the North Carolina General Assembly, we voted on new district maps for the N.C. House and Senate, we passed an environmental package including GenX provisions and we adjourned the August special session.

  • Start of school year brings increase in CIS volunteer needs

    By Todd Beane

    Guest Columnist

    The 2017-18 academic year officially began Aug. 28 and everyone in the educational system, from staff to students to administrators, is excited for the journey and adventure of a new school year.

    Stretching from late August to early June, there may be times when the journey feels never-ending as both obstacles and achievements are encountered, but every person in every role shares the same goal of students finishing the journey smarter and stronger than when they started.

  • District 17 House update

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    We in the North Carolina General Assembly convened in regular sessions Thursday, Aug. 24. Much activity was going on outside these sessions. I was able to attend meetings back here in the district on tourism and on Teacher of the Year for Brunswick County, we held the first meeting of the Environmental Review Commission in Wilmington and we convened in Raleigh for veto overrides and new legislative districts.

  • Sounds, stress and trying to tune out the noise

    Once, when I lived in Ehringhaus on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill, I got in some trouble when I slept through a fire alarm.

    Thankfully, there was no fire. But my resident adviser and a few of the firefighters who responded couldn’t understand why it took so long for the shrill screeching coming directly from outside my dorm room door to rouse me. They thought maybe I was under the influence, but no. It’s just that when I’m good and tired, I can sleep through just about any loudness.