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Columns

  • Community failed student for trying to prohibit religious song

    "Christian Songs Get OK'd at Schools' Talent Show."

    Among all the day’s global headlines—the latest from Libya, earthquake relief in Japan and the anticipated premiere of “Dancing With the Stars”—this one caught my attention.

  • Signs of the times in Calabash

    Just when you think everything is hunky-dory in the Seafood Capital is usually when a new issue crops up to keep Calabash-ians (and reporters) on their toes.

    Some people there think it’s not enough to have a cute neon restaurant arrow or big gift-shop sign memorializing the town once called Pea Landing.

    Leaders, heavy on the merchant side, are feeling the town could do better—has done better—back in the golden days when it had a few big, honkin’ “Calabash Seafood” signs and restaurants lining Beach Drive.

  • Sometimes getting public access is more difficult than it should be

    I cut my journalism teeth working in a small, rural Kentucky community where generations of my family were born, went to school, worked and died.

    I rarely went out without having to talk about my last name, what part of the county I lived in and where I grew up. 

  • Celebrate today

    Most weeks I consider my job more fun than work. But there are weeks I question my career choice.

    No one wants to write the story of a town grieving for the loss of a much loved public figure, or of a fire that destroyed two small businesses and severely injured a man, or about a bicyclist run over by three cars on U.S. 17, or about a family of four dying in a car wreck. But writing these types of stories comes with the job. Unfortunately, last week they were all in the paper—it was a sad news week.

  • Happy Sunshine Week from behind the (freedom of information) battle lines

    Is it really that time of year again? My, how times flies.

    It’s Sunshine Week. Besides being my favorite time of the year, Sunshine Week is a week each year created to celebrate freedom of information and your right to know.

    Started (suitably) by a group of news editors in Florida in 2002, Sunshine Week was taken over by the National Society of News Editors in 2003, and the rest, as they say, is history.

    This week, hundreds of news organizations and community groups celebrate the public’s right to know during the weeklong celebration.

  • We’re looking for interesting Brunswick Countians to tell their stories

    When was the last time you sat down with a friend, neighbor, classmate or fellow churchgoer and thought, “Wow, what an interesting person!”?

    When was the last time you had a chat with someone and their life story was so interesting you couldn’t wait to share it with the next person you spoke with?

    Has there been a person in the community who has shared his or her life experiences with you and you’ve thought, “Man, someone should write this down.”

    Well, that’s exactly what we want to do.

  • Bus tour of Sunset Beach brings new parking rules

    Bumping along on a bus on unpaved roads with town council isn’t anyone’s idea of a thrill ride. At least not mine.

    And if it were thrilling, it probably wouldn’t be allowed, because amusement rides aren’t part of the Sunset Beach island landscape.

    But council wanted to take a closer look at the parking sites it was about to prohibit. Hence, as part of a specially called meeting with the council-appointed beach parking committee on the morning of Feb. 18, members boarded a Sea Trail shuttle bus and headed for the island.

  • Donate prom dresses and accessories to help local girls in need

    The blue one was special because it made me feel elegant.

    The yellow one with rhinestones had a full skirt and made me feel like a princess.

    I initially didn’t want to try on the pink one because it didn’t have enough sparkle, but once my mom convinced me to, I never wanted to take it off.

    Even though I haven’t worn any of my prom or formal dresses for about a decade, I will never forget the feeling when I first put them on or how they looked in the pictures or the memories made while wearing them.

  • Earthquake? Sonic boom? Seneca guns? Nope, just Smith Avenue

    My office is violently shaking while I write this. 

    If I weren’t so accustomed to it, I may worry it were an earthquake. 

    If I weren’t so used to it, I may wonder if some jet just left a sonic boom in its wake.

    If I weren’t so familiar with my monitor shaking while I read and write, I might be more interested in trying to find out exactly what the Seneca guns are and why they fire so frequently in Brunswick County.

  • Sorry, Charlie. Your owner’s got to do this one on her own

    N.C. Gov. Bev Perdue thinks you’re dumb.

    Well, maybe that’s a little extreme. Let’s put it this way: Perdue thinks her dog Charlie is smarter than you.

    I’m guessing by now I’ve not only gotten your attention, but probably ticked you off a little bit, so let me explain.

    On our fair governor’s website, there’s a new tool—more like a game, really, in which you, along with Perdue’s best canine friend Charlie, can do what Perdue and her Democratic henchmen cannot—balance the state budget.