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Columns

  • Why is it the older we get, the easier we forget how old we are?

    Hey, 2010, where are you going? It seems like you just got here and already we’re preparing to say goodbye.

    I remember as a child asking older relatives about their ages. Often they would pause, and then do a bit of math in their heads before spitting out an age.

    Frequently, they’d realize they had miscalculated and would soon make a correction and indicate another age, most often a number higher—another year older—than originally thought.

  • White Christmastime is worth a write-up

    FROM THE SNOWY SIDE OF INTERSTATE 40—One of my New Year’s resolutions for 2011 is to keep a better diary—or weather log, whichever comes first.
    Since conditions this week decided to take a turn of white—one for the season and record books—I decided to start early and do both, smack at the tail end of 2010.

  • 2010: The year of the voter and the year their voices were heard

    This past year was a year of a great many things.

    We had some great stories in 2010. We had big news.

    In next week’s Beacon, we take a look at the stories that shaped 2010, and how each one of those stories will undoubtedly shape and affect the future. So, don’t forget to pick up the Dec. 30 issue of the Beacon, where you’ll find those stories.

  • The helpless feeling cancer evokes in many of us

    Cancer.

    That word has been filling my ears far too frequently. In the last couple of months, several people I know have had to permanently add that dreaded word to their vocabularies. 

    It’s makes me mad. It makes me sad. It makes me feel helpless.

    This sense of helplessness takes me back to the same emotions I felt several years. Below, I am republishing a column I wrote in 2005 for The Kentucky Standard. It was written when a dear friend—now my husband—learned his father was facing cancer.

  • Winners announced in Brunswick 365 photo contest

    For the past two years, we at The Brunswick Beacon have asked readers to submit photos depicting their unique views of Brunswick County for our annual photo contest. Aptly named Uniquely Brunswick County, submissions showed the area’s beautiful beaches, local landmarks and wildlife.

    This year, we were looking for something different. We wanted to know how our readers see Brunswick County 365 days a year. This year has been interesting. With a rare snowfall and record rainfall, it seemed the photo opportunities in 2010 were endless.

  • Bridge brings own brand of brouhaha

    Just when you thought it was finally safe to cross the Intracoastal Waterway on a deluxe, no-waiting-required high-rise bridge, a whole new can of worms crawls out.

    First and foremost, since the new $40 million-or-so span officially opened to traffic Nov. 11, was the wreck that occurred within 24 hours at its mainland entry, spurring some townspeople to demand installation of a traffic light there.

  • Someone forgot to tell Mother Nature we prefer it warm

    In 2007 when I had the opportunity to come to Brunswick County, I also had a chance to leave the U.S. and get a taste of the newspaper business in Canaada.

    Know much about Edmonton, Alberta, Canada? 

    It’s beautiful, with rolling flat fields of bright yellow canola in the summer. The sky stretches forever, and white fluffy clouds seem to be within reach. If you tiptoe just high enough, maybe you can jump up and touch one. 

    Summers in Alberta are enticing.

  • Limit politicians’ terms in office so it doesn’t lead to terms in the penitentiary

    Talk about a slap on the wrist (not to mention a colossal waste of taxpayer money).

    Our dear former governor, known across the state as the “education governor,” but known affectionately around these parts as “Sleasley,” Mike Easley pleaded guilty to one felony count of certifying a false campaign report in state court last month.

    One count, $1,000 fine, no jail time—that’s apparently your punishment if you’re a former governor.

    Rubbish!

  • Programs such as Head Start help kids get an early start on learning

    We’ve had several stories and editorials lately about how many people in our community need help especially during the holidays.

    This isn’t something new. There have always been people in our community who need a little extra assistance, especially families this time of year.

    It reminds me to count my blessings because I was one of those kids myself. 

  • Cyber Monday girl not up for the hassle that is Black Friday

    I have always loved to watch game shows on TV, but I never expected to find myself in a real-life version.

    One of my favorites was always “Supermarket Sweep.” Three teams took turns to guess the price of items and win 10 seconds to build up a lengthy sweep time. The big sweep, as it was called, was a free-for-all, where one person from each team tried to fill his or her shopping cart with the most expensive items in hopes of having the highest grocery bill at the end.