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Columns

  • Say thank you to teachers for educating your children

    As I peek around the corner of his bedroom, I see my son, Levi, sleeping soundly. He’s stretched out in this crib, with his arm around his stuffed dog.

    I dread the battle ahead of me. I know Levi will cry and scream as I wake him from his peaceful sleep and get him dressed for day care. But it’s what I have to do. The fit will only last a short time. As soon as we are out the door, he will be happy again. That’s because he knows he’s going to day care.

  • Questioning my views, biases? Here they are

    Numerous pundits on the Internet, the letters to the editor pages and the 24-hour-cable networks like to question reporters’ biases, ask where we get our facts and basically, accuse us of being shills or liars.

    Some of us need it. Sometimes, reporters don’t report. Some repeat talking points or ignore important issues in favor of personalities and scandals.

  • If it were all you had, what would your 30-day, get-it-done challenge be?

    Forgive me for being morbid, but I think about death and dying probably more often than I should. It’s an unfortunate learned trait, picked up from a mother who experienced too much death too soon in life.

    After watching her mother, father, oldest brother and other relatives die from cancer she was convinced some day she too would experience the slow, painful battle with the disease. But her death was neither slow nor painful; she died suddenly—and very unexpectedly—in a car crash.

  • Spring things bring sole-ful weekend times

    It’s that most wonderful time of year when people weary of taxes, the economy and goings-on in Cala-clash can and should venture outside themselves and soak up some spring things going on in Brunswick County.

    I know I did that just this past Saturday, when I was invited to be a judge in the Calabash Fire Department’s first Show and Shine Car Show.

    If the fire department hired me for my car-judging expertise, they had asked the right woman.

    Any car that looks pretty, has cruise control and a great stereo always gets my vote.

  • Spring break renews energy

    Spending time away from the office for a week was a great way to recharge my batteries.

    I spent most of the time with my 6-year-old in Charlotte visiting my brother, sister-in-law and 11-month-old nephew. It was a delight, especially since he started walking while we were there.

    My daughter Taryn and I also made a visit to Discovery Place, where she saw a mad scientist blow things up, made all sorts of scientific discoveries and watched her first IMAX movie, “Fly Me to the Moon,” (not a great movie for adults, but she liked it.)

  • Toddler unfortunately learns how to use cell phone at early age

    I often hear parents talking about how their son or daughter has racked up a huge cell phone bill from excessive calling and texting. I even heard one parent say a child had sent 30,000 text messages in a month.

    Well, my son has yet to send 30,000 texts in a month, but he can text and call people. He’s even managed to access the mobile Web feature on my phone. While I have yet to get an astronomical phone bill, I know it’s just a matter of time. After all, he’s already figured this much out at the tender age of 18 months.

  • Elected officials should read documents before voting for or against issues

    After the hurried passage of the Stimulus Bill, Americans became aware of just how quickly Congress was passing bills members may not have gotten around to reading before voting on them.

    The sheer volume of the 1,000-plus page behemoth bill indicated no one had ample time to digest or even read the bill before the fever of ayes ensued in both Houses. But the Stimulus Bill was not the first bill rushed through Congress and, unfortunately, probably won’t be the last.

  • An alligator name game

    If you’ve been in Brunswick County long enough, you probably realize by now that alligators aren’t exactly welcome sights.

    That’s because they usually arrive unannounced in your backyard pond, halfway up the steps of your house or on the 9th fairway as you’re trying to sink a golf ball or walk your dog, as many locals have discovered.

  • A government bailout of the newspaper industry is the last thing it needs

    Everywhere I go the question is always the same: What is the future of newspapers?

    I try my best to forecast where the newspaper industry is headed—opining about how I think community newspapers will outlive dailies, preaching newspapers must befriend not begrudge the Internet and reminding people there will always be the need for quality, objective news.

    But the answer is simple—the newspaper industry is headed where the market takes it.

  • Elderly woman wants others to be aware of possible phone scam

    When 80-year-old Emily Clark got a call from someone alleging to be her grandson last week, she knew fairly quickly something wasn’t quite right.

    The caller said he was in jail in Canada and needed help. Money would be required to bond him out of the pen after he was allegedly involved in a wreck. The caller pleaded with Clark to not call his parents because they told him not to go to Canada. He didn’t want them to know he was there, so instead he called his “grandmother” for help.