.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • The face of substance abuse may be more familiar than you thought

    Ever wondered what a drug addict looks like? Think you could spot an alcoholic just by looking at them?

    It might not be what you expect.

    It’s not like the movies, and it’s not a problem only facing inner cities or big metropolitan areas. It doesn’t exist solely in dingy, dark alleyways.

    The drug problem, as it has been vaguely dubbed, affects people from all walks of life—it’s not about black or white, rich or poor. It’s about people.

  • Candidates aren't perfect, but they can be positive

    I realize no person is perfect. Keeping that in mind, we cannot expect to have a political candidate who is without flaw.

    Every person has flaws. The ability to recognize your own shortcomings and address them is what makes someone a great leader.

    Earlier this week, the Beacon received a phone call about some “chickens” at the Brunswick County Courthouse. These “chickens” were there to greet Rep. Mike McIntyre as he attempted to address the issues of his constituents at a community forum.

  • Remembering to respect elders

    Large segments of the youth population no longer make a distinction between their personal peers and the adult population. Some young people have not been taught to respect their elders.

    It is disturbing to hear some young people say they only respect their parents and have little or no respect for other adults.

    Some parents are teaching their children to refrain from saying, “yes sir” or “no sir.” They are teaching them to say, “yes” or “no” to everyone regardless of the age or position of the person.

  • Keeping clutter to a minimum harder than

    I stayed out of work last Friday to de-clutter my house.

    After going through my closet, I ended up taking two trash bags and a large box full of clothes to a local thrift store and taking out three or four bags of trash—mostly in the form of old gift bags and bows that at one point I must’ve thought were re-usable.

    It was a very cathartic experience, and I now have a much better view of my shoes. (I see several pairs that need to be donated, as well).

    After taking all the bags and boxes to the thrift store, I treated myself to lunch at an outdoor eatery.

  • The impact of World War II rationing on two little boys

    My dinner guest was looking over our family photos posted around the living room.

    He came across the one shown here of my brother, Jim, 4 years old, and me, at 5, taken by our grandmother in 1943. She was so proud of her Kodak Brownie Six-20 camera, and Jim and me, too.

    At first, the conversation centered on our trim little physiques. My guest noted we were borderline skinny by today’s standards.

    Then, he poked fun at the high-top leather shoes we were wearing. They were bigger than our feet—almost like clown shoes.

  • Out-of-control baby fever hits superstar-obsessed mags

    All of Hollywood and tabloid readers alike can breathe easy—Brad and Angelina’s twins have arrived.

    Now I’m a self-proclaimed tabloid junkie, but this is too much even for me.

    Reports are circulating on the Internet the first published baby photos are being shopped for about $20 million.

    Break it down, that’s $10 million per baby.

    An editor from People appeared on The Early Show and denied the magazine had made an offer as reported.

  • Questions every citizen should be able to answer

    What do native-born Americans really know about “my country ‘tis of thee, sweet land of liberty”?

    Think they’re smarter than the many immigrants seeking precious citizenship? Even a fifth-grade one?

    This past Fourth of July Eve, a record 98 people representing 48 countries became United States citizens during a naturalization ceremony in Southport.

  • Find fresh food, crafts and treats in new location

    This Saturday, the Shallotte Farmers Market will move from the town hall parking lot to Lions Club Park beside Shallotte Plaza on Main Street. It will give the public easier access to vendors and the vendors a more comfortable, shadier spot for selling.

    My daughter and I went to the last market day at town hall last Saturday to talk to a few people and get photos for an upcoming story for the Beacon’s Island Living magazine.

    She served as my sidekick, writing her own “notes” as I made the rounds from table to table.

  • When did we stop caring for all mankind, especially in times of need?

    When did we get so busy, so self-involved, that as humans we have forgotten compassion and how to care for one another?

    In recent months news accounts have told the stories of men and women who have been struck by very unfortunate circumstances and left to suffer—and in some cases die—while others offered no help.

    The most recent incident involves a woman in New York who went to the right place to get help—a hospital.

  • Bravery was on display last week in Brunswick County courtroom

    I saw bravery last week in the faces of two 20-something women.

    Two young women, just out of college, should be busy decorating their new apartments and going out with friends, not testifying in a rape trial.

    But these two young women, now 22 and 23 years old, came back to Brunswick County to testify in the trial of a man who kidnapped and raped them seven years ago.

    They took the stand and with explicit detail relived the worst night of their lives to a judge, three lawyers, 12 jurors and the man who did it.