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Letters

  • Items taken from cemetery

    To the editor: This week I went to visit a wonderful and very much loved friend. I visit with him every day and usually twice a day.

    This time when I got there, lots of things were wrong. He uses a cross for his night-light and when there isn’t sun to power that, his battery-powered candles do the trick. There are many tokens of love left for him by the ones who love him most.

    Messages written in the sand, wiped away. You see I visit my most treasured love at Mintz Cemetery. We lost him Aug.26, 2008.

  • Remembering a good neighbor

    To the editor: I have been a fortunate man, and have lived a long, full life. I gladly embrace the teaching of the Christian religion and since I am late in a long life, I await my fate. But one of the greatest fortunes that befell me, besides the love of my wonderful wife, is the greatest joy of knowing Stan Salvatore.

    Stan died on April 17 while recovering from a serious attack of emphysema. He had been suffering from that dreaded health problem for some time. He was probably the greatest friend I ever had in my life.

  • Responds to meeting violation allegation

    To the editor: Suggested reading: “Open Meetings and Local Governments in N.C.” by David Lawrence and “Rules for Small Local Government Boards” by Fleming Bell (both professors at the School of Government, Chapel Hill).

    An official meeting is when a public body meets to deliberate, or act on town business. A quorum is the majority of the board plus the mayor or four commissioners. When three members of the board meet in private to deliberate, or act on town business, that is a violation of the open meeting law.

  • Responds to claims

    To the editor: Brunswick Beacon are you completely ignorant of North Carolina Open Meetings Law, or are you just so brazen you don’t care if you print the truth or not?

    When you blatantly accuse anyone of a violation, I would have hoped you have your facts straight. Clearly not a concern to the Beacon but should be to your readers.

    Once again you show your ignorance in stating that three commissioners in Calabash constitute a quorum. This is not the case either.

  • Thanks for help with home

    To the editor: On Tuesday, April 28, around 10:45 p.m. a drunk driver smashed the car he was driving into my home, causing some significant structural damage.

    My wife and I were uninjured and would like to extend our thanks to the following first responders who came to our aid: The N.C. Highway Patrol, The Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office, the Ocean Isle and Sunset Beach police and fire departments and local EMS services.

    We would also like to thank others who have helped us begin our repairs.

  • Learning from the citizens' academy

    To the editor: What would cause a person to respond to a call for help at 5 p.m. and be four hours late for dinner or leave his home at 2 a.m. to respond to a serious accident or crime?

    Since attending the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Citizens Law Enforcement Academy, I think I have the answer.

    I am so amazed at the honest concern, teamwork and devotion the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office has to protect us. We were instructed on everything from history, to patrol and detective divisions, to courthouse procedures to narcotics.

  • Support March of Dimes fundraiser

    To the editor: Most people do not recall the first steps they ever took. Due to birth defects, my sister took her first steps when she was 4-and-a-half years old with the aid of leg braces. Those braces were provided by the March of Dimes.

    Established by President Roosevelt in 1938, it was called The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. In 1979, the name was officially changed to the March of Dimes.

    In 2001, the World Health Organization reported only 480 cases of polio worldwide, due partly to research and funding from the March of Dimes.

  • Say no to Senate Bill 921

    To the editor: Senate Bill 921, introduced by Sen. Tony Ward (D), would allow ABC liquor sales on Sunday.

    It is estimated this could add $5.5 million to state coffers. The problem is, this revenue is on the backs of victims with the associated misery and indebtedness. These laws were created in Colonial times so people inclined to go to church would not be tempted to buy liquor instead.

  • Mother's Day service sponsored by NAACP

    To the editor: Are you tired of the same thing every Mother’s Day? Are you tired of going out to eat after morning service, getting over-full, coming home, going to sleep, and then waking up in the afternoon and wondering if Mother’s Day is over?

    Well, not if you come to St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Bolivia at 5 p.m. on Mother’s Day, May 10, for a real Mother’s Day “Mother of the Year” meal—the Bread of Life.

  • Bothered by officer assault story

    To the editor: I read the story about a Holden Beach officer being charged with assault. I am reading this on April 23 and the alleged assault took place on April 7.

    In most cases where there is an assault reported by the newspaper, there is a victim and something about what happened. Not in this case.

    So I guess if you are an officer of the law, this is not important. When it is all over with, there will probably not be anything in the paper to tell what had happened.