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Letters

  • Why are cases dismissed?

    To the editor:

    Each week, I examine the long list of cases at our district court. I am amazed at the high percentage of cases that are “voluntarily dismissed.”

    Maybe I do not understand this terminology, but I think this means for some reason the cases were dismissed and the defendant is allowed to walk away unpunished. Is this true?

    Why are 40-50 percent of the cases dismissed? Is there a reasonable explanation for this? Surely, I must be wrong. We would not go to all the trouble of writing up these cases and then dismiss half of them.

  • Volunteers make a difference

    To the editor: National Volunteer Week (April 19-25) is hot on our heels, and it is a great time to take action and begin solving problems in our communities. Volunteers inspire by example by encouraging those they help and motivating others to get involved.

  • Inmate plan could work

    To the editor: I just read the article regarding Sheriff Ingram pondering having inmates work at county animal shelters. I really think that is a wonderful idea.

    I see these young inmates working on the sides of the roads with litter pickup. They do a great job, but I really wish residents would extend a little courtesy toward them and stop throwing their litter out of their cars after these young ones clean it up.

  • Global warming ponderings

    To the editor: Regardless of your current position on global warming, please consider one simple mental exercise that will allow you to put this political and financial issue into proper perspective.

  • Thanks for help

    To the editor: Yes, there are wonderful citizens in your county. One of them simply has the first name Dawn and drives a dark colored 4WD.

    On Saturday, I accidentally mislaid my paperwork after attending the county’s education job fair on top of my car and drove off. The next thing I knew, papers were flying everywhere.

  • Realtor doesn’t speak for all

    To the editor:

    I know your readers remember the letter to the editor Brad Vanderburg, manager of Century 21 Sunset Realty, wrote a few weeks ago regarding Mary Ann Bechtel opening her own business in the article a “Leap of Faith.”

    Let me say empathically Vanderburg did not speak for me. The things he said were unprofessional for someone who is a manager of a real estate office.

  • Thanks for being a good citizen

    To the editor: I’m writing this to congratulate Ginny Quaglia of Ocean Isle Beach for her doing her duty as a conscientious citizen.

    Her letter to the Beacon (March 19) demonstrated the frustration of a taxpayer when trying to get a politician (Sen. Kay Hagan) to respond to a simple request for information about certain outrageous actions by those in Washington.

    The stimulus package was extremely bad for our country and the way Hagan’s office treated this woman is a sign of how arrogant our elected officials have become.

  • A Yankee who loves the South

    To the editor: “There are too many Yankees down here!” This phrase was uttered to me by someone who I believe is a good friend of mine and who will remain anonymous.

    I cannot take this personally. I realize that even 140 years can’t erase some of the remnants of resentment caused by this bloodbath war and reckless destruction that occurred in our country’s history.

  • The list goes on and on

    To the editor: Today’s media headlines make me painfully aware of the following clear violations of American laws, regulations and just plain old good behavior: a $50 billion fraud perpetrated by Bernard L. Madoff, in plain sight of whistle blowers and the SEC; illegal aliens crossing the U.S. border in uncontrolled droves, with every law enforcement officers and politician watching it happen and taking little action, if any action at all; the U.S.

  • Encourage young drivers to be careful

    To the editor: For 30 years, I worked with the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office and retired as a lieutenant in charge of major crimes.

    I have been on hundreds of crime scenes and consider myself immune to images that are not for the faint of heart.

    Since retiring from the sheriff’s department, I now work as an investigator for the Brunswick County District Attorney’s Office and as a deputy coroner.