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Letters

  • Welcome back, Sam Hickman

    To the editor:

    Being a subscriber of The Brunswick Beacon, I wanted to let you know how thrilled I was to see the return of Sam Hickman.

    My wife and I have a second home in Sea Trail, and my family had a retail store years ago in Shallotte and later in Southport: J.S. Mann’s.

  • End-of-Grade testing times make no sense

    To the editor:

    I was disturbed by what I encountered recently while monitoring/proctoring a fourth-grade N.C. End-of-Grade mathematics test at an elementary school in Brunswick County at the end of the school year.

    The test was three hours in length. It started at 9:38 a.m. By 10:18 a.m., one brilliant student had finished the test. A few minutes later, another brilliant student had finished the test. Other brilliant students finished along the way, with the last brilliant student finishing the test at 12:28 p.m.

  • Story didn’t adequately summarize comments

    To the editor:

    My public address comments at the June 6 meeting of the Shallotte Board of Aldermen were not adequately summarized in the June 15 Beacon story on that meeting.

    I addressed the board about three matters. The first was concerning the problem created on Shallotte Avenue by adding the sidewalk, which caused mailboxes to be placed too close to road, making it nearly impossible for two vehicles to meet each other safely. I did mention the construction traffic, but that was because having large construction vehicles on the road exacerbated the problem.

  • Still no need to hunt gators

    To the editor:

    I attended the forum on alligator management recently held in Bolivia. I thought the presentation by the staff was very well handled.

    Despite it being an open meeting, very few were in attendance and yet the staff thought it had been one of the best-attended forums.

  • Proposed roundabout would create more problems

    To the editor:

    The experience you described in your June 15 column illustrates my objections to the double roundabout proposed for the Smith Avenue/U.S. 17 interchange in Shallotte. In that case, if I’m reading maps right, there’s going to be two circles in the roundabout. The inner circle just going around so that anyone in it would have to move to the outer circle to exit the roundabout. Then you cross a bridge and enter into another roundabout.

  • Politics put trouble on our horizon

    To the editor:

    We have to face the plain and simple facts. Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan did not win and Barack Obama and Joe Biden did. Republicans seemed bent on revenge, determined to insure Obama would not succeed as president.

    After eight years, it was time for a party change, voters said, so rather than having a female president, they elected a man with no experience, education or interest in government.

  • Block release of GenX into our waters

    To the editor:

    Below is the official statement issued by the Brunswick Environmental Action Team (BEAT) regarding the release of Gen X into the Cape Fear River Watershed and impacting the drinking water in Brunswick and New Hanover counties. The BEAT Board of Directors unanimously approved this statement by a 7-0 vote.

  • Lack of culvert maintenance causes flooding

    To the editor:

  • Help stop SB 126 passage

    To the editor:

    The column, “Enough is enough,” by Shallotte Mayor Walt Eccard in the June 1 edition discusses the potential loss of a large amount of sales tax revenue because of the North Carolina legislature.

    The mayors of Brunswick County have taken steps such as traveling to Raleigh and writing letters to representatives to voice their concerns about the pending Senate Bill 126.

    I agree with Eccard in the case this pending action by North Carolina is not beneficial to the counties that produce large revenues.

  • Gause stories may be linked in local history

    To the editor:

    During a quick scan of the June 8 edition, I was struck by the appearance of two stories printed side-by-side on the front page. Both of them were excellent articles and first compliments should be given to the writers.

    As a history student, I have been following the William Gause Jr. story since it came out in 2015, and now, one or more of the descendents plan to continue pursuing the saga with the help of archaeological students and on a wider scope.