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Letters

  • Standing up for taxpayers

    To the editor:

    The Beacon accurately reported my frustration toward council candidate Charlie Nern on Oct. 17. After the incident, I sent an apology to my colleagues and provided a copy to the Beacon to also alert them. The newspaper’s effort to contact me before its deadline was unfortunately unsuccessful.

  • ‘Tax Payers’ Digest’ spreads misinformation

    To the editor:

    Voters in Sunset Beach were recently mailed a mélange of misinformation and bias, the “Tax Payers’ Digest,” published by town councilman Richard Cerrato. Mr. Cerrato refuses to work cooperatively with others on the council, and constantly bends facts to suit his view of town government.

  • County needs straight answer on drinking water safety

    To the editor:

    I have just written a letter to the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners and the Brunswick County Public Utilities Commissioners that asks for a straightforward statement from them as to whether the drinking water in our county is safe to drink.

    We all know the horrible example of Flint, Mich., where that city’s public utility board and its elected governing board failed to alert its citizens of possible real danger in their water.

  • Backpedaling on park use

    To the editor:

    On a most basic level, I do not support Sunset Beach town property being used as a venue for a private business to operate for profit.

    I believe the park’s purpose is for the enjoyment of the citizens and guests as a recreational facility. As such, I can understand the park being used for special events.

  • Be engaged in town affairs

    To the editor:

    Here’s a dismal fact: Out of about 3,500 registered voters in Sunset Beach, only 1,100 voted in the last municipal election.

    So why don’t citizens of Sunset Beach vote in municipal elections?

    Maybe it’s the same reason they don’t attend town council meetings: it’s inconvenient, it cuts into dinnertime or it’s not important.

  • Beware of bad contractors

    To the editor:

    When was the last time you needed a contractor to get some work done in Brunswick County? For the past several months, I have been trying to get work accomplished after I purchased a metal building, but prep work needed to prepare the site for it.

  • Anglers helped save man’s life

    To the editor:

    A round of applause goes to the fishermen Oct. 8 at Sunset Beach Pier. They were definitely fishers of men this day.

    A young man was fighting the surf when several men on the pier noticed his panic. They started yelling and waving, alerting beach goers to help. Several men pulled him to shore and EMTs were notified. You all rock!

    I’m also sending get-well wishes to the young man who was in distress.

    Donna Perkins

    Calabash

  • Candidate gives mixed message

    To the editor:

    Political season has arrived and with it, the clutter of campaign signs.

    A candidate for Sunset Beach Town Council, Duane Lewis, proudly promotes he will “Make Sunset Beach Friendly Again.” Catchy phrase, obviously inspired by another “people’s champion” on the national stage (for now).

  • Thank you for great Sunset at Sunset

    Editor’s note: The writer is a candidate for Sunset Beach Town Council in the Nov. 7 municipal election.

    To the editor:

    I would like to extend my sincere thanks to the Sunset at Sunset committee and to all the other volunteers that worked so hard to make the 2017 Sunset at Sunset Festival a fantastic success. I love seeing so many people come together to make Sunset Beach the great place it is to work and play.

  • Help save college financial aid

    To the editor:

    The future of college financial aid is in dire straits.

    Pell Grants, which ensure low-income students the opportunity to attend college, are under attack in Congress.

    The FY17 spending agreement passed by Congress in May 2017 rescinded $1.3 billion from Pell Grants. This plan cut the grant program’s surplus, which is funding needed to pay for grants when the congressional prediction for how much aid is needed falls short.