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Letters

  • Twin lakes don’t draw tourists

     

    To the editor:

    We all want our neighbors to maintain their property. If not, the town of Sunset Beach has ordinances to ensure they do. If they don’t, the town will do the work and invoice the owner.

  • Lack of directional signaling shows motorists’ lack of common sense

    To the editor:

    Referencing his letter printed in the Aug. 14 edition of the Beacon, kudos to Michael Jones.

    As he states, the use of automobile directional signals is fast becoming a thing of the past. This is second on my list of pet motoring peeves, topped only by use of cell phones while driving, which has become epidemic here in this country.

  • Stats in letter make almost no sense

    To the editor:

    Regarding G.L. Herbin’s letter in the Aug. 14 edition: I did not get the point or understand the statistics in it. Herbin claimed 145 million folks draw a check each month from the government.

    In fact, 63 million receive an earned Social Security check and 12.8 million receive welfare checks, only 15 percent of which are Hispanic. Herbin also claims that there are only 85 million taxpayers in America these days, but in fact, in 2013, 139 million folks paid FICA taxes, which was only on 75 percent of wages paid in 2013.

  • Citizens, taxpayers deserve transparency, consideration

    To the editor:

    I write this letter to offer constructive criticism to the planning board or any other town board, committee, department or council and to provide information for Sunset Beach taxpayers. At the last planning board meeting (Aug. 7), I respectfully asked for more transparency in the posted agenda. The online agenda for that meeting did not list swimming pools as a topic, as well as other important items that were discussed.

  • Public school employees lose in state budget

    To the editor:

    Although GOP leaders claim that public school employees were winners in the 2014-15 budget fight, the fine print indicates that they were overall losers. About 3,300 teacher assistants will lose their jobs when funding is cut by $105 million. Many experienced teachers will lose their longevity pay and receive less than a 2 percent salary increase. Although it has been almost 10 years since new textbooks were purchased, the book allowance for the entire state will be $1 million — only 60 cents per student.

  • Democrats’ voters are welfare class

    To the editor:

    When the world and civilization needed a Charles Martel or Charlemagne and his paladins, sometimes known as the Twelve Peers, what did the dependent, defective and delinquent class of voters elect? They elected the court jester and his band of clowns.

  • BFA thanks county residents for generosity

    To the editor:

    The residents of Brunswick County are to be commended for their outpouring of support for the Brunswick Family Assistance (BFA) Back-to-School program.

  • Weighing in on last edition

    To the editor:

    My sincere opinions pertaining to the following articles in the Aug. 14 edition of the Beacon:

    Thank you for your column in regard to Robin Williams and Jonathan Winters. I wholeheartedly agree with all you state.

    Chief Presiding Justice of Superior Court of Brunswick County Marion R. Warren has “proven beyond all reasonable doubt” that he is worthy to become an appellate presiding justice of the court in Raleigh. All residents of Brunswick County are fortunate to have him.

  • Canopies needed for cancer prevention

    To the editor:

    My family has been vacationing at Sunset Beach for more than two decades. I was surprised when I heard rumors during our July visit that tents on the beach may be prohibited in the future. As a dermatologist, I am distressed to hear this is being considered.

  • Becoming vegan reduces pollution

    To the editor:

    Last weekend, the drinking water of 400,000 Toledo, Ohio, residents was fouled by animal waste.

    With unfettered growth of animal agriculture and ineffective discharge regulations, it will happen again in our own state. The problem has become pervasive. Waste from chicken farms has rendered ocean off the East Coast unfit for fishing. Waste from Midwest cattle ranches carried by the Mississippi River has created a permanent “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico larger than that of the infamous 2010 BP oil spill.