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Today's Opinions

  • Elected officials should read documents before voting for or against issues

    After the hurried passage of the Stimulus Bill, Americans became aware of just how quickly Congress was passing bills members may not have gotten around to reading before voting on them.

    The sheer volume of the 1,000-plus page behemoth bill indicated no one had ample time to digest or even read the bill before the fever of ayes ensued in both Houses. But the Stimulus Bill was not the first bill rushed through Congress and, unfortunately, probably won’t be the last.

  • Agrees with column

    To the editor:

    As baseball season nears, I enjoyed Bob Breen’s column last week.

    I also agree with Bob’s opinion of George S., but he did not say anything about today’s turf. That turned me off more than George S.

    Oh, well. Maybe if George S. lets Whitey Ford throw the first pitch to Yogi, I will come back to baseball.

    Hal Moore

    Calabash

  • Why are cases dismissed?

    To the editor:

    Each week, I examine the long list of cases at our district court. I am amazed at the high percentage of cases that are “voluntarily dismissed.”

    Maybe I do not understand this terminology, but I think this means for some reason the cases were dismissed and the defendant is allowed to walk away unpunished. Is this true?

    Why are 40-50 percent of the cases dismissed? Is there a reasonable explanation for this? Surely, I must be wrong. We would not go to all the trouble of writing up these cases and then dismiss half of them.

  • An alligator name game

    If you’ve been in Brunswick County long enough, you probably realize by now that alligators aren’t exactly welcome sights.

    That’s because they usually arrive unannounced in your backyard pond, halfway up the steps of your house or on the 9th fairway as you’re trying to sink a golf ball or walk your dog, as many locals have discovered.

  • Carolina Shores should release information immediately

    We believe the Carolina Shores Board of Commissioners violated N.C. Open Meetings Law last week when it went into closed session to discuss, what we later found out, were concerns about Mayor Stephen Selby’s “behavioral pattern.”

    Following the hour-and-a-half closed session, the board reconvened in open session and agreed unanimously to have the town attorney, Holt Moore III, send a letter to Selby about his behavior.

  • A government bailout of the newspaper industry is the last thing it needs

    Everywhere I go the question is always the same: What is the future of newspapers?

    I try my best to forecast where the newspaper industry is headed—opining about how I think community newspapers will outlive dailies, preaching newspapers must befriend not begrudge the Internet and reminding people there will always be the need for quality, objective news.

    But the answer is simple—the newspaper industry is headed where the market takes it.

  • Elderly woman wants others to be aware of possible phone scam

    When 80-year-old Emily Clark got a call from someone alleging to be her grandson last week, she knew fairly quickly something wasn’t quite right.

    The caller said he was in jail in Canada and needed help. Money would be required to bond him out of the pen after he was allegedly involved in a wreck. The caller pleaded with Clark to not call his parents because they told him not to go to Canada. He didn’t want them to know he was there, so instead he called his “grandmother” for help.

  • Why has common sense eluded those enthralled by an alligator?

    Last weekend, an alligator found a new home in a retention pond that’s only a few feet from where I live.

    I’m not a native Brunswick Countian, and I will admit, seeing one of these creatures up-close for the first time is an experience. It’s not like you see those kinds of animals on the shores of Lake Michigan or while you’re walking through the streets of downtown Chicago, so to a Midwesterner, it’s definitely an experience.