.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Government is the problem

    To the editor: Many in our country unfortunately share Michael Darby’s socialist ideas. If we continue on a socialist path, as he advocates, our country will be only a shell of what we are now.

    Our healthcare is our personal responsibility—not Exxon’s or the government’s.

    The mess our current system is in can be laid at the feet of government in the form of regulations and intervention. If we want the best healthcare in the world to fail, along with a system that is already failing, more government involvement will do the trick.

  • Sunshine Week: It's about your right to know

    The Beacon’s recent adventure into examining how local agencies respond to open records requests was eye-opening.

    On our part, we learned the value of understanding, in very specific terms, exactly what it is we are looking for. Because wording among agencies may vary, we learned how important it is to clearly explain what it is we need.

    We learned it’s important to have a good understanding of the public records law before going into an agency and to be prepared, at any time, to explain that to the individuals who have the records we want.

  • Toilet terror: Unbelievable but true

    Has everyone heard the story about the poor woman in Kansas who spent the past two years in her boyfriend’s bathroom and was found stuck to the toilet seat?

    If you haven’t, trust me, I’m not making it up.

    According to various published reports, a 35-year-old Kansas woman, now identified as Pam Babcock, went into her boyfriend’s bathroom two years ago, and when he asked her to come out, she refused. So, he brought her food and water.

  • The light at the end of the tunnel: The outlook for FOI

    With higher temperatures and March sunshine, it really seems like our long Minnesota winter is coming to a close. This brings us a sense of optimism and hope.

    And it’s a metaphor for the future of freedom of information. I believe it is no coincidence that James Madison, drafter of the First Amendment, was born on March 16.

    This year, for the first time in a long time, there seems to be a real prospect that transparency in government could be restored.

  • Easter traditions provide lasting memories of childhood

    Growing up in a devout Catholic household, we celebrated holidays in many more ways than just going to church.

    On Sunday nights during the Christmas season, we’d light our own advent wreath and read passages from the Bible.

    On Friday nights during Lent, we’d attend the Stations of the Cross and follow it by attending the parish fish fry.

    We’d always have to give up at least one of our favorite treats during Lent, and our parents made sure we stuck to it.

  • Sunshine Week is about your right to information

    Last week I sounded a bit like a broken record here in the Beacon newsroom.

    “It’s not about us, it’s about the public,” I said repeatedly; so much so that a co-worker pointed it out to me.

    But it was an important point I had to make.

    In preparation for our Sunshine Week issue, we visited 19 different local agencies throughout the county making public records requests at each agency.

    Last week, we called every agency we visited to make a public records request.

  • Coupon scam teaches difficult lesson

    One night I logged into my e-mail account to find 923 messages; 922 of them were junk.

    My mom said she never wanted to be that popular. But, I am thanks to a little faux pas I committed a few weeks ago.

    There I was, minding my own business, checking my 14 e-mails when something in the subject–line caught my eye. It said, “Free coupons and baby gear.”

    I couldn’t resist, so I clicked on it. The message showed a cute little smiling baby, along with the brand names Huggies, Johnson & Johnson and Gerber.

  • Some issues to consider when choosing the next president

    I am not a paid political pundit or an elected official, but I am a political observer who has studied the platforms of the remaining presidential candidates.

    After studying those platforms, I am convinced some of the most brilliant minds go unheard because society is more impressed with those who have money, prestige and status than they are with those who have common sense.

    The question every voter should ask during this election year is which presidential candidate will protect the physical safety and the economic plight of America regardless of race, color or creed?