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Today's Opinions

  • No excuse for cruelty to animals

    Meet Pearl, a three-week-old cat who was tossed from a moving vehicle onto N.C. 130 last Wednesday. She suffered a broken eye socket, broken jaw and severe lacerations to her face and legs; even in a black-and-white photo, you can see the blood.

    Someone saw what happened to Pearl and rescued her. The tiny kitten made it thorough emergency surgery at Ocean Isle Veterinary Hospital hours later and, after round-the-clock foster care, joined the family of Doug and Brandi Turner of Douglas Diamond Jewelers in Shallotte who will keep her safe and loved.

  • Assessment guides county health goals

    The good news is Brunswick County reduced its premature death, prostate cancer death and colon cancer death rates last year.

    The bad news is its number of injury/accidental deaths, obesity and low birth rates increased in 2015.

    As for physical activity, the number of uninsured citizens and violent crime in our county, rates remained about the same. That can be considered good or bad news, depending on one’s point of view.

  • Child abuse prevention is still as important as ever

    Nearly five children in the United States die every day as a result of child abuse, according to Childhelp, a national organization dedicated to child abuse prevention. Childhelp’s position, and ours, is any number is too many.

    Brunswick County has not escaped this terrible problem. Just two months ago, a Leland man was charged in an updated indictment related to the death of a 15-month-old boy he is accused of killing last year.

  • Make time for drug survey

    It should not be news to anyone Brunswick County is in the throes of an epidemic caused by prescription drug and heroin abuse, but perhaps more people are beginning to realize how close to home the problem hits.

    The Brunswick Coalition is working to fight it and needs your help. All it requires is a few minutes of your time to fill out a quick questionnaire, “Brunswick County Partnerships for Success Grant Community Survey,” which is available online at surveymonkey.com/r/JCX5D8g.

  • New 911 center critical to county

    In a crisis, many people think of law enforcement officers, firefighters and paramedics as their first responders.

    But more often than not today, before they arrive at a scene, it is the dispatcher who answers the 911 call upon whom we must rely for determining the appropriate course of action.

    Sight unseen and with lighting speed, these telecommunications professionals serve as a lifeline not just for those immediately facing an emergency, but also for the public safety personnel who respond to it.

  • Exceeding speed limits is always unlawful

    Social media was abuzz last week about theN.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program’s latestcampaign to crack down on motorists who speed on state roads.

    “Obey the Sign or Pay the Fine” was billed as an enforcement blitz scheduled between March 24 and April 3 to target drivers who violate speed limits.

  • Beach maintenance, renourishment requires a team effort

    Last week, residents of and visitors to the East Coast received word the Obama administration’s newest version of a proposed five-year plan for offshore oil and natural gas drilling does not include plans for oil and natural gas leasing activity in the Southern Atlantic region.

    While the decision certainly helps preserve the ecological integrity of North Carolina’s shoreline, the issue of maintaining and renourishing Brunswick County beaches must remain a priority at the local and state levels.

  • Students should be safe from hate at school

    It is perfectly reasonable for the parents and guardians of children who attend Brunswick County Schools to expect students to be able to learn in a safe, nurturing environment.

    What happened last Wednesday, March 9, at West Brunswick High School, when five students caused a racially charged disruption using a Confederate flag, shows that is not always the case.