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Today's Opinions

  • Child-care facilities should put kids first

    To the editor: In response to an editorial in an earlier edition of the Beacon, I was amazed anyone who deals with children every day would not want the child’s best interest at heart.

    I commend the grandparent for being professional in the manner that she was; however, the provider may need to realize the needs of a child is the first priority.

    I can honestly say, don’t stereotype child-care facilities. We are not all like this. We love all our

    children and treat each as individuals meeting all their needs.

  • We have long been at war

    To the editor: As most people now know, our nation is in serious trouble. It started many years ago when the international bankers got control of our money.

    One of the big bankers, Rothchild, stated: “Give me control of a nation’s money, and I don’t care who the King is.” In other words, he would control the nation’s leaders.

    This has been going on since 1913 when the so-called Federal Reserve was established. The international bankers create wars so they can finance both sides at a large rate of interest.

  • April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

    To the editor: April is Child Abuse Prevention Month. In 2009, Prevent Child Abuse North Carolina celebrates 30 years of working to make our state a better place for children and families.

    North Carolina is a much bigger, diverse and more populous place than it was when PCANC started this work. North Carolina has 40 percent more children than it did 30 years ago.

    This is our most vulnerable population, but also one that offers us great hope. These children are our future workers, teachers, voters, professionals and parents.

  • Plant is toxic

    To the editor: We are writing this letter in an attempt to raise the awareness of the toxicity of the oleander plant and hopefully prevent a recurrence of our misfortune.

    On March 13, we lost our beloved West Highland terrier, Murphy, and the cause of death was the ingestion of oleander

    leaves. Since his death, we have spent a great deal of time on the Internet researching information on this beautiful and prevalent plant on our island.

  • Friends contribute to Facebook addiction

    Laura Lewis

    It was pretty silly, really, when Bubba Joe, my old high school buddy living in Illinois, invited me to become one of his friends on Facebook.

    I’m too old for this, I thought. I don’t have any decent, recent photographs to post. None of my friends are young enough to be on there—are they? And what exactly is Facebook?

  • Calabash commissioners need to work together

    Calabash commissioners, if your board remains as divided as it has appeared to be in the last couple of weeks, town business is going to go nowhere fast.

    At a recent meeting, three of you removed yourselves from your seats and moved into the audience, trying to prove the point you wouldn’t be part of a discussion in which you were in disagreement.

  • What can be done to help the poor?

    In these difficult economic times, Brunswick County resource agencies continue to see a growing number of people needing help.

    From assistance with rent and mortgages, to help getting food and clothes, many nonprofits and area churches are feeling a crunch.

    Instead of focusing on just band-aiding these difficult situations, many involved in community outreach want to do more—they want to examine the depth of poverty here and figure out long-term solutions to some of the issues that have plagued Brunswick County for generations.

  • Supply-side economics versus employee-centered economics

    President Ronald Reagan was a great proponent of supply-side economics. He believed in major tax breaks for businesses and corporations; believing businesses and corporate executives would objectively share the company’s profits with employees with little or no oversight.

    On paper, supply-side economics is a great concept. It would be the ideal business model in a fair and just world. The problem is human nature. Greed and self-centered goals and objectives caused numerous executives to unfairly enrich themselves at the expense of hard-working investors or employees.