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Today's Opinions

  • Causes of the economic dilemma

    To the editor:

    People with poor credit and creditors making poor credit decisions have caused our economic dilemma.

    We with good credit are paying the price. What you need to do is refinance the houses of the top 25 percent of the credit market (especially those on fixed incomes) and lower their mortgage rate by 1 percent for free.

    We deserve a break, being we are the ones having to pay for everyone else’s poor credit and poor credit decisions.

  • Reduce vacation-booking risks

    To the editor:

    Vacation home rental management companies in the Southport-Oak Island area of North Carolina are applauding the latest efforts of insurance companies to work with the general public to reduce their risk in early bookings of vacation home rentals at the beach.

    In response to their customers, select trip insurance providers have decreased the minimum employment time requirement from five years to one year. Trip insurance is purchased at the time of booking for a nominal fee based on total rental cost.

  • County should re-evaluate commuting compensation

    In light of revenue shortfalls and budget deficits, we’re wondering how Brunswick County Commissioners can justify tossing $20,000 in the air and allowing it to land in the pockets of five department heads in the form of “commuting stipends.”

  • Toddler unfortunately learns how to use cell phone at early age

    I often hear parents talking about how their son or daughter has racked up a huge cell phone bill from excessive calling and texting. I even heard one parent say a child had sent 30,000 text messages in a month.

    Well, my son has yet to send 30,000 texts in a month, but he can text and call people. He’s even managed to access the mobile Web feature on my phone. While I have yet to get an astronomical phone bill, I know it’s just a matter of time. After all, he’s already figured this much out at the tender age of 18 months.

  • Elected officials should read documents before voting for or against issues

    After the hurried passage of the Stimulus Bill, Americans became aware of just how quickly Congress was passing bills members may not have gotten around to reading before voting on them.

    The sheer volume of the 1,000-plus page behemoth bill indicated no one had ample time to digest or even read the bill before the fever of ayes ensued in both Houses. But the Stimulus Bill was not the first bill rushed through Congress and, unfortunately, probably won’t be the last.

  • Agrees with column

    To the editor:

    As baseball season nears, I enjoyed Bob Breen’s column last week.

    I also agree with Bob’s opinion of George S., but he did not say anything about today’s turf. That turned me off more than George S.

    Oh, well. Maybe if George S. lets Whitey Ford throw the first pitch to Yogi, I will come back to baseball.

    Hal Moore

    Calabash

  • Why are cases dismissed?

    To the editor:

    Each week, I examine the long list of cases at our district court. I am amazed at the high percentage of cases that are “voluntarily dismissed.”

    Maybe I do not understand this terminology, but I think this means for some reason the cases were dismissed and the defendant is allowed to walk away unpunished. Is this true?

    Why are 40-50 percent of the cases dismissed? Is there a reasonable explanation for this? Surely, I must be wrong. We would not go to all the trouble of writing up these cases and then dismiss half of them.

  • An alligator name game

    If you’ve been in Brunswick County long enough, you probably realize by now that alligators aren’t exactly welcome sights.

    That’s because they usually arrive unannounced in your backyard pond, halfway up the steps of your house or on the 9th fairway as you’re trying to sink a golf ball or walk your dog, as many locals have discovered.