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Today's Opinions

  • 'Confessions' evokes memories of commercials past

    “Confessions of a Mad Man: From Madison Avenue to Island Sands” (see accompanying story) contains insider anecdotes from a man who helped create Americans’ need for “stuff” after World War II. It’s the kind of tell-all we love to read about—the good stuff that’s not in the history books.

  • Elected officials work for you

    It appears some elected officials have forgotten or don’t care about who they work for—the people of Brunswick County.

    In Carolina Shores, the commissioners (elected officials) feel it’s their place to censure town mayor Stephen Selby (another elected official), and they think they have the right to do so without hearing what citizens think.

    On Friday, commissioners told the people of Carolina Shores they didn’t care about what they had to say by announcing the board would not take public comment during a special meeting.

  • You can’t fix stupid, but you can throw money at it

    When you’re talking about nearly $800 billion, what’s another $18 million? That’s not even enough to cover the interest—spend it.

    I would venture the previous statement sums up the entire thought process that went into the decision to spend nearly $18 million over the next six years to revamp recovery.gov, the government-run Web site that tracks where and how stimulus money is being spent.

    Adding insult to injury, taxpayers are actually footing the $18 million bill just so they can see where their stimulus money is being spent.

  • Gray areas in law leaves room for much interpretation

    Lots of things are open to interpretation. Messages in the Bible, dreams, types of dancing, and yes, the law.

    And while my interpretation of the law may differ from the attorney representing the Brunswick County Board of Education, I expect an explanation of why my interpretation is inaccurate, if nothing else.

    The board’s meeting Thursday night, which lasted until the early hours Friday morning and contained two closed sessions, ended with no official action taken.

  • Getting access to public information is sometimes harder than it should be

    Getting the news out to the public can be a mix of fun and excitement. Sometimes it’s hard; sometimes it’s emotional.

    And sometimes, it can be down right intimidating.

    As a reporter in Kentucky, I was eager to join up with law enforcement one day after receiving a call about an indoor marijuana-growing operation in my hometown. The officers invited me along and told me I was welcome to take pictures of the enterprise, the likes of which hadn’t been seen in the area before.

    I showed up with two cameras in tow, a notebook and several pens.

  • More in store in Carolina Shores

    Four months after Carolina Shores commissioners took part in a questionable closed session and emerged with a reprimand of Mayor Stephen Selby, their asphalt is starting to show.

    The “asphalt scandal,” after all, is commissioners’ first item on their list of infractions Selby has committed since his election as mayor in November 2007, according to a censure-ship resolution approved 3-2 by the board last Friday.

  • Speak out about healthcare reform

    To the editor: I have spent the week listening to the radio, watching the news and reading the paper trying to grasp this healthcare reform bill that Congress is pushing, as if it were the greatest reform ever presented.

    I seem to remember last year the huge stimulus package was touted as that exact same thing, and we see where that got us. I took the time recently to contact my congressmen and actually find out what their stances are and voice my opinion.

  • Appalled by commissioners' actions

    To the editor: I cannot believe the town of Calabash would hire someone and not do a background check, especially when town policy dictates so.

    Mr. King’s excuse is they have never done a criminal check on anyone. Ms. Herman knew nothing of this until a reporter told her. What is wrong with this picture? A convenience store employee goes through a more thorough check than this person that is supposed to be running the town.