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Today's Opinions

  • Open letter to legislators

    To the editor: After I received my tax bill I noted the Calabash fire fee had increased from $50 to $100.

    I called the tax office and was told, "The legislators voted for the increase."

    So this is why we send you there? To vote a 100 percent increase mostly to the senior citizens on fixed income? Did our homes get any larger? Or did our cost of living increase?

    What is the logic in your actions?

    It's outrageous elected officials can act with no consideration.

  • Booze It and Lose It, similiar programs keep roads safe

    Between Aug. 17 and Sept. 3 last year, there were more than 500 alcohol-related crashes on North Carolina roads. Twenty-seven people were killed and more than 400 were injured.

    In an effort to lower those numbers and help keep roads safe, law enforcement officers throughout the state participated in a recent Booze It & Lose It campaign. Local and state law enforcement stepped up patrols throughout the Labor Day holiday weekend to make sure drunk drivers stayed off local roads, and quickly apprehended those who decided to drink and drive.

  • Remembering N.C.'s most determined journalist

    A salute with a cramped, arthritis-ridden writing hand for the 150th anniversary of the first publication from the man the N.C. Press Association calls the state’s most determined journalist, John McLean Harrington.

    I stumbled upon the story of this remarkable writer, reporter, editor and publisher while perusing the association’s Web site and learned his unique story.

    According to a story Michael Ray Smith, Harrington (1839-1887) produced 299 newspapers in his lifetime, and get this—all by hand.

  • The Civil War years at Ocean Isle Beach (1860 to 1865)

    Ocean Isle Beach saw a good deal of Civil War naval action between blockade-runners of the Confederacy and gunboats of the Union Navy.

    Confederate solders were stationed along Ocean Isle Beach to protect blockade-runners using Tubbs Inlet or Shallotte Inlet. If a blockade-runner had to be beached to avoid capture, the ship’s crew would frantically unload cargo while the land soldiers held off Union gunboats.

    North Carolina provided more troops to the Confederacy than any other state, and many of these soldiers came from Brunswick County.

  • You got to have heart to find out what will make you a successful person

    In the 1960s, a leading sports commentator spoke these piercing words about the 26-mile marathon race.

    He said, “There are many things that can break the body, a tragic wreck, a prolonged illness, a natural disaster. But the marathon breaks the heart.”

    Courage is synonymous with the heart because the heart is the center of life. The Bible says it is from the heart that precedes all thoughts of envy and strife. Negative and positive thoughts originate in the heart.

  • Weighing the facts about the Republican vice-presidential candidate

    A woman? From Alaska? But who is she? What has she done? What about Mitt?

    These were the thoughts swirling around my head Friday when Sen. John McCain announced his running mate for his presidential bid, a woman, from Alaska, who was clearly not Mitt Romney.

    After my initial reaction, which wasn’t exactly elation, I took a deep breath and switched out of voter mode and dove back into reporter mode.

    It was time to find out who this woman from Alaska was and, more importantly, what she stands for. That’s what we do, after all.

  • Mentoring is an essential process for democratic nations

    Movie celebrities and sports champions come and go, but we long remember our teachers and mentors because they reached into our lives and made a lasting difference.

    Since 2000, I have been a mentor for police officers in Bosnia, Kosovo and Iraq—cultures much different than ours. I will share some important principles I have learned along the way.

    Setting the stage

    My work as an International Police Officer with the United Nations Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) began in the fall of 2001, just as Ramadan was under way for adults in the Albanian Muslim population.

  • Open your closet door, Superintendent McGee

    To the editor:

    Many years ago there was a weekly radio program that featured a character named Fibber McGee who had a closet filled with all sorts of junk. His wife would warn him not to open the closet door, but each week Fibber opened the door and all its contents would come spilling out.

    Brunswick County has another McGee who also has a closet. Unlike Fibber, this McGee seems to want to keep that door closed with its contents out of view. That hasn’t always been the case.