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Today's Opinions

  • Beloved dog teaches owner value of forgiveness, forgetting, friendship

    Dogs can teach humans more things than we can ever teach them. Teaching your dog how to sit, lie down, roll over and shake does not even compare to the lessons they unknowingly teach us.

    One of the most important lessons dogs teach their owners—and quite possibly the most overlooked—is forgiveness. While everyone should practice forgiveness, it’s an act that does not always come easily.

  • Debating, public forums key part of political process

    When The Brunswick Beacon joins other sponsors this month in hosting two political forums, some key players won’t be there.

    On Tuesday, Oct. 7, The Beacon will join the Alliance of Brunswick County Property Owners Association and other media sponsors in hosting a forum that features candidates for local and state political offices.

    Among attendees for the 6 p.m. event at Odell Williamson Auditorium will be candidates for the Brunswick County Board of Education, Brunswick County Commissioners, N.C. Senate, N.C. House and U.S. House of Representatives.

  • The queen is dead—let's hope

    Ever since the 1950s, when popular entertainment became big business, middle-class Americans, especially women, have had a particular affection for what’s now referred to as “the queen,” a gay man who denies his orientation, makes fun of himself and dresses in gaudy, outlandish outfits.

    It started with Liberace, the man all middle-class housewives loved to watch on television. He showed what every man could accomplish in post-war America, rising “above” his Midwestern roots to practically own Las Vegas.

  • History of Ocean Isle Beach: The Beginning Years (1946 to 1963)

    In 1947 and 1948, Odell Williamson began purchasing tracks of land that eventually comprised Ocean Isle Beach. These tracks of land were owned by various families, including the Brooks family, the Stanley family, the Gore family and the D. Stowe Crouse family.

    Williamson was originally in partnership with Mannon Gore, but Gore and Williamson soon parted ways, dissolving the partnership. Gore’s son, Ed Gore, soon focused on developing Sunset Beach while Williamson focused on Ocean Isle Beach.

  • Ghosts? Anomalies? Or things that can be explained away?

    As part-skeptic, part-believer in some things unexplainable, I was always eager to tag along each October with a friend turned certified ghost hunter while I was a reporter in Kentucky.

    Each October for several years, I’d catch up with Patti Starr, a once-restaurant manager who now leads an interesting life as a full-time ghost hunter. Patti teaches a ghost-hunting course at a Kentucky community college and takes part in a traveling lecture series with well-known psychic/medium Chip Coffey.

  • Upcoming November election gets reporter fired up about politics

    I’ve been fired up about the upcoming election since last January, when I had the opportunity to cover the Republican presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, S.C. It was an incredible experience, and one I hope to repeat. Since then, which hardly seems like nine months ago, I’ve had many more opportunities to cover debates, elections and other political functions. I can’t get enough of it—it’s the best part of my job.

  • Saving the wolves and rocking the political boat

    Last Wednesday, my family sat down to dinner. It is rare when we can all get together during the week. Grandma had cooked a roast and invited everyone to our house. We were in the middle of dinner when the phone rang.

    I jumped up to get it but wasn’t quite fast enough. Grandma can be quite spry when it comes to the phone. It’s usually for her anyway.

    “Hello,” she said.

    We had all stopped eating and we were waiting for her to finish up and come back to the table so we could eat.

  • Gossip destroys lives

    We are living in a time when many men and women are caught up in a web of lies and half-truths.

    The National Enquirer and many other gossip magazines have become major enterprises because the appetite for vicious rumors and half-truths is at fever pitch.

    Bad news has become a psychological drug for many people. Some people actually experience a feeling of euphoria when they read or share vicious gossip or rumors about others.