.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Agrees with book's view

    To the editor: Pastor Andrew Moyo has recently written a powerful book titled, “Working the Works of God.”

    One part of the book was of special interest to me. Pastor Moyo grew up, became a Christian and pastor/evangelist in the country of Uganda. He took a leading part in a great revival there in the mid 1990s.

  • Young people should show more respect

    To the editor: Generally speaking, I read the editorials with an open mind. It seems the majority of them are from readers complaining about one thing or another (politics or some issue to do with schools).

    My remarks are in response to “Reward teachers” submitted by Brenda Davis and “Remembering to respect elders” by Michael Darby. I have been a subscriber to the Beacon since April 1989 and feel that these are two of the best editorial articles in all those years.

  • Upset about animal rules

    To the editor: Re: “Agreeable animal welfare changes” article by Laura LewiseeTo say I am shocked and heartsick does not begin to express the views of myself and many others I know who are concerned about the welfare of animals.

    In my opinion, members of our state General Assembly, the Brunswick County Board of Health and Brunswick County Animal Services have taken giant steps backward.

  • Medical clinic provides worthwhile services

    Someone who hasn’t been feeling well for months visits doctor after doctor, finding none who will accept him because he has no money or insurance coverage.

    He finally finds a free clinic about 30 miles away from his home, where a family nurse practitioner examines him, realizes what’s wrong and prescribes the medicine he needs to get better.

  • Drug court, policing programs good for county

    For many petty criminals, life on the wrong side of the law is often spurred by bad choices directly associated with drug and alcohol addiction.

    Sending those violators directly to jail, without rehabilitation plans, including a strong drug and alcohol recovery program, can do little to help many who, when out on the streets again, return to the same behaviors that put them in jail.

  • Quality customer service is key to attracting, retaining business

    After more than a year of not seeing friends and loved ones in Canada, I was excited recently when a week away from work gave me to chance to fly north to reconnect.

    Waking at 4 a.m., I set out on my adventure to fly several thousand miles and end up in a time zone two hours behind where I started. The flights were uneventful. The layover times were just enough.

    After landing on time at my Canadian destination, I breezed through Customs and patiently waited for my luggage to be unloaded, spin down the rotating conveyor belt and send me on my way.

  • The face of substance abuse may be more familiar than you thought

    Ever wondered what a drug addict looks like? Think you could spot an alcoholic just by looking at them?

    It might not be what you expect.

    It’s not like the movies, and it’s not a problem only facing inner cities or big metropolitan areas. It doesn’t exist solely in dingy, dark alleyways.

    The drug problem, as it has been vaguely dubbed, affects people from all walks of life—it’s not about black or white, rich or poor. It’s about people.

  • Candidates aren't perfect, but they can be positive

    I realize no person is perfect. Keeping that in mind, we cannot expect to have a political candidate who is without flaw.

    Every person has flaws. The ability to recognize your own shortcomings and address them is what makes someone a great leader.

    Earlier this week, the Beacon received a phone call about some “chickens” at the Brunswick County Courthouse. These “chickens” were there to greet Rep. Mike McIntyre as he attempted to address the issues of his constituents at a community forum.