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Today's Opinions

  • A new school year is almost upon us

    The first day of classes for Brunswick County Schools students is not until Aug. 28, which means it is not too late to prepare for the start of the 2017-18 school year.

    Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram provides important safety tips for motorists to follow all year round, not just when school is in session, in his Sheriff’s Corner column this week. Following is a compendium of other helpful back-to-school hints we found.

    For parents, from the U.S. Department of Education:

  • Stand against seismic testing, offshore drilling

    This past weekend, the North Carolina Coastal Federation recognized Navassa Mayor Eulis Willis with a Pelican Award for his work on Kerr-McGee wood treatment Superfund site cleanup “that benefits the entire coast and state of North Carolina.” The plant, which operated from the 1930s to the 1970s, shut down in 1980. Creosote and sludge left on the site entered the marshes adjacent to the Brunswick River and Sturgeon Creek, which flow into the Cape Fear River.

  • Library move suits growth, reflects changing functions

    Last month, members of the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to transform the South Brunswick Island Center into the new Hickmans Crossroads Library.

    The county will take possession of the SBIC (not to be confused with the South Brunswick Interchurch Council) from Brunswick Community College in January, having agreed May 1 to buy it from the college for $1.7 million. The price reflects its listed tax value for 2015, but County Manager Ann Hardy said a much more recent rough estimate for the current value is about $1.2 million.

  • Gore makes county proud while serving country

    When members of the Coast Guard typically make the news in Brunswick County, it is because they have come to the rescue of distressed swimmers and boaters, or because they are assisting local agencies with searches in and along our waterways.

    The members of Coast Guard Auxiliaries and Flotillas are just as active in our county, most notably for offering free vessel safety checks and reminding us about the importance of wearing life vests on personal watercraft and boats of all sizes.

  • House Bill 205 scheme strives to keep public in the dark

    The fundamental purpose of newspapers has been to cultivate an informed readership. Regardless of political leanings, newspapers at their core are champions of the public’s right to know about the issues and events affecting their lives.

  • Play remains vital for children

    This year’s Independence Day fireworks in Calabash were preceded by activities for children, including faith painting and a dunk tank, to make the annual event even more family-friendly. These additions not only helped kids blow off a little steam on a humid evening, but also encouraged them to participate in playtime.

  • Credit citizens’ effort for Navassa cleanup progress

    As Navassa prepares to celebrate its 36th annual Homecoming this weekend, residents continue to cope with the environmental aftermath of a former creosote plant in their community since it closed just a year before the event was established.

    Creosote, which is made by distilling coal tar at extremely high heat, is used to preserve wood and commonly used on utility poles. It was produced on a 250-acre site by the Brunswick River and Sturgeon Creek for more than 40 years before the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. shuttered it in 1980.

  • Respect for flag should extend to people

    As we prepare to celebrate our nation’s independence, we expect to see red, white and blue, starred and striped decorations throughout our community.

    The sight of the U.S. flag inspires passionate feelings about the freedoms we enjoy and emotions tend to run high where its proper display is concerned.

    The U.S. Flag Code is the ultimate reference for presenting our nation’s colors with reverence.

    Among its highlights: