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Today's Opinions

  • It is not too late to prepare for 2017 hurricane season

    Even before Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma wrought their devastation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has the potential to be extremely active — maybe the most active since 2010. In the first nine weeks of the 2017 season, which runs through Nov. 30, there were six named storms — twice as many as would typically form by early August.

  • Earlier Sunday alcohol sales make sense

    Gov. Roy Cooper on June 30 signed Senate Bill 155, called the “brunch bill” because it allows the sale of alcoholic beverages starting at 10 a.m. Sundays with local government approval, into law.

    The North Carolina Restaurant & Lodging Association lobbied hard for passage of the bill, touted by its sponsors as an added boost to the state’s hospitality and tourism industries.

  • Disasters both near and far highlight constant needs

    Tragedies have dominated the news as summer draws to a close.

    We mourn Edward Michael Mylod and his teenage son, Casey Mylod, who died in a fire at their Oak Island home Aug. 24. We share collective dismay that the Coast Guard had to call off its search for Steve Chaney and David Hambrick, cousins who went missing Aug. 27 while fishing off the coast of Oak Island.

  • Teacher Academy should remain in place for future

    Classes for the 2017-18 school year just kicked off this past Monday for most Brunswick County schools, but already students and teachers can expect to harvest the fruits of success that took root during the inaugural Teacher Academy.

    Brunswick County Board of Education member John Thompson planted the seed for the program last fall to address three issues: teacher pay, accountability for student performance and changes in the educational system.

  • Park use problem rooted in permit cost and duration

    For all the questions in recent weeks surrounding the Waterfront Market at Sunset Beach in Sunset Beach Town Park, certain details are clear.

    No one dislikes the market.

    No one wants it to be discontinued.

    No one believes Waterway Markets LLC, consisting of market managers Chris Wilson, Susan Bradford and Carol Corbett and market partner Emily Shea, does a poor job of operating the market.

    No one has said Wilson, Bradford, Corbett and Shea are bad people; rather, they are viewed as savvy businesswomen.

  • A new school year is almost upon us

    The first day of classes for Brunswick County Schools students is not until Aug. 28, which means it is not too late to prepare for the start of the 2017-18 school year.

    Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram provides important safety tips for motorists to follow all year round, not just when school is in session, in his Sheriff’s Corner column this week. Following is a compendium of other helpful back-to-school hints we found.

    For parents, from the U.S. Department of Education:

  • Stand against seismic testing, offshore drilling

    This past weekend, the North Carolina Coastal Federation recognized Navassa Mayor Eulis Willis with a Pelican Award for his work on Kerr-McGee wood treatment Superfund site cleanup “that benefits the entire coast and state of North Carolina.” The plant, which operated from the 1930s to the 1970s, shut down in 1980. Creosote and sludge left on the site entered the marshes adjacent to the Brunswick River and Sturgeon Creek, which flow into the Cape Fear River.

  • Library move suits growth, reflects changing functions

    Last month, members of the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to transform the South Brunswick Island Center into the new Hickmans Crossroads Library.

    The county will take possession of the SBIC (not to be confused with the South Brunswick Interchurch Council) from Brunswick Community College in January, having agreed May 1 to buy it from the college for $1.7 million. The price reflects its listed tax value for 2015, but County Manager Ann Hardy said a much more recent rough estimate for the current value is about $1.2 million.