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Today's Opinions

  • Maritime Museum needs your support

    To the editor:

    I know change is the key to our current economic crisis. Change makes us clean our houses and start over, but as an owner of a house, the things we keep are antiques with value, family pictures and family treasures and heirlooms.

    For Southport, those items are kept in the Maritime Museum.

  • VAC speaks out about town issues

    To the editor:

    Regarding the letter of Gere Dale commenting on Bill Brennan and Walter Goodenough, please be aware of the following:

    Perhaps, Mr. Dale, The Village At Calabash (VAC) now comprises only 15 percent of Carolina Shores, that was not the case when we were involuntarily annexed back in 2003.

  • WAVES4K.I.D.S. needs mentors

    To the editor:

    For most of my adult life, I have been an advocate for children. Now, as the newly elected president of WAVES4K.I.D.S., I am making an appeal to those of you who share my concerns for the future of our foster youth to become a trained WAVES4K.I.D.S mentor.

    National statistics show only two out of 10 foster youth have any degree of success once they age out of the system and lose the support and services that have been provided by the state.

  • A Harley rally here could be a big boost to the local economy

    The thought of a lot of noise—roaring engines—and traffic congestion may have filled some people’s minds when the Beacon announced last week Shallotte was being considered for an upcoming Harley rally.

    At a Shallotte pre-agenda meeting last Tuesday night, Rick Noyes, owner of the new Coastal Carolina Harley Davidson store on U.S. 17 in Shallotte, asked the town if it would support his attempts to bring the Harley Davidson Spring Beach Rally to town the week of May 10-17.

    It has since been announced the event will be in New Bern.

  • Some refreshers for officials on public records laws

    Sixty-eight hundred pages deep, not including the attorney’s discovery, I waded through public records at the N.C. Department of Insurance last month.

    After poorly navigating the maze of one-way streets that makes up downtown Raleigh, I eventually wound up in a circa 1982 conference room in the Dobbs Building. For the next two days, I trudged through e-mails, memos and charts looking to shed some light on the process used to determine the controversial rate increases to homeowners’ insurance in coastal counties.

  • Responds to Carolina Shores letter

    To the editor: I seldom respond to a letter to the editor, but the letter from Carolina Shores resident Bill Brennan contained a number of factual errors as well as omissions of facts. I am compelled therefore to respond.

    At the town meeting to which Brennan refers, I did not “chastise the residents of the Village of Calabash development,” but my remarks were directed solely to Brennan and close associate Goodenough.

  • Letter to elected officials

    To the editor:

    I am writing to let you know I strongly oppose the new insurance ruling that will allow insurance companies to increase coastal insurance rates by nearly 30 percent. To even consider such a huge increase is outrageous, especially when you consider their stated reason: “We are due for a huge devastating hurricane on the N.C. coast and if we have a storm of such magnitude, it will virtually wipe out all the insurance company financial reserves.”

  • Rate increases should have had more public discussion

    Elected officials representing Brunswick County and other coastal communities have joined together to fight against what many are calling unfairly high homeowners’ insurance rate increases for this and other North Carolina beach communities.

    Their push, including bills introduced in the North Carolina House and Senate, has been fueled by the outrage of many coastal residents who feel the 29.8 percent coastal insurance increase is too high, too unfair and done without enough public input.