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Today's Opinions

  • Friends contribute to Facebook addiction

    Laura Lewis

    It was pretty silly, really, when Bubba Joe, my old high school buddy living in Illinois, invited me to become one of his friends on Facebook.

    I’m too old for this, I thought. I don’t have any decent, recent photographs to post. None of my friends are young enough to be on there—are they? And what exactly is Facebook?

  • Calabash commissioners need to work together

    Calabash commissioners, if your board remains as divided as it has appeared to be in the last couple of weeks, town business is going to go nowhere fast.

    At a recent meeting, three of you removed yourselves from your seats and moved into the audience, trying to prove the point you wouldn’t be part of a discussion in which you were in disagreement.

  • What can be done to help the poor?

    In these difficult economic times, Brunswick County resource agencies continue to see a growing number of people needing help.

    From assistance with rent and mortgages, to help getting food and clothes, many nonprofits and area churches are feeling a crunch.

    Instead of focusing on just band-aiding these difficult situations, many involved in community outreach want to do more—they want to examine the depth of poverty here and figure out long-term solutions to some of the issues that have plagued Brunswick County for generations.

  • Supply-side economics versus employee-centered economics

    President Ronald Reagan was a great proponent of supply-side economics. He believed in major tax breaks for businesses and corporations; believing businesses and corporate executives would objectively share the company’s profits with employees with little or no oversight.

    On paper, supply-side economics is a great concept. It would be the ideal business model in a fair and just world. The problem is human nature. Greed and self-centered goals and objectives caused numerous executives to unfairly enrich themselves at the expense of hard-working investors or employees.

  • In due time--It's time for North Carolina to adopt a better policy

    “In due time.” Oak Island Town Attorney Brian Edes wrote in an e-mail to Colin Tarrant, the attorney representing Brian Keese in a public records lawsuit, that he or Oak Island Town Administrator Jerry Walters would respond to a request for public records “in due time.”

    A year and a half later, this matter remains unresolved. With a June 29 trial date set, the case could drag on for months.

    “In due time.”

  • Doesn’t agree with story coverage

    To the editor:

    As a business owner and manger I certainly appreciate the media’s role in disseminating news items of national and small town importance. I also appreciate its role in advertising and promoting local businesses.

    However, after reading the article on the front page of the Beacon concerning “a Leap of Faith” written about one of the local real estate agents leaving her long-term affiliate company to embark in her own business disturbed my sense of fairness and loyalty.

  • Doesn’t agree with park

    To the editor:

    (This is in answer to the myth the majority of the residents of Wildwood approve the park and the way it was done.)

    In a community meeting one week prior to the last town meeting, nine residents of Wild Raven Street in Wildwood Village met to discuss the proposed park, location and our requirements.

    To the best of my knowledge, only three people were at the first town meeting at 5 p.m. The town called those three a majority.

  • Celebrate National Ag Day

    To the editor:

    Where does your food come from?

    If you’re like many Americans, the answer is the grocery store. And frankly, that disturbs me.

    The grocery store isn’t where food comes from—it’s just from where it’s distributed. In reality, far too many people are unaware of the role of American agriculture in their daily lives...and what it really takes to have food on their dinner table.

    Just a few generations ago, most people were a part of, and had friends or