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Today's Opinions

  • Why are so many cases dismissed?

    To the editor: I am a homeowner on Ocean Isle Beach and a Beacon subscriber. I live in Monroe.

    Week after week, I read the district court dockets. I would like someone to explain to me why, week after week, I see cases are voluntarily dismissed.

    Am I confused or does that mean a police officer took the time to write a ticket and then is too lazy to go to court to make sure the person is proven guilty? If that is the case, there is no excuse for it and it is a waste of taxpayers’ money.

  • Widow wants crime registry

    To the editor:

    Recently, I e-mailed Rep. Mike McIntyre requesting his help to push for the implementation and enforcement of a violent criminals’ registry in North Carolina. I would also like tougher laws for repeat offenders.

    McIntyre’s response was to inform me we already have a sex offenders’ registry and “since you are interested in criminal registries, we are trying to pass a bill through legislation to set up a drug offenders’ registry.”

  • Want to make a difference? Vote

    To the editor: It is amazing to me someone who was writing an article deriding the practice of bringing Gov. Sarah Palin’s “pregnant teenage daughter” into the political fray of today’s presidential election would spend the next 137 words (out of a 444 word column) doing exactly what she was criticizing others for.

    Blaming Bristol Palin for our lot in life will not solve any problems. She did not ask to be involved in this process, her mother did. Making her the weekend focus of the campaign news cycle was only done because it was easy.

  • Tragic events drive politicians

    To the editor: High offices are almost always driven by events such as 9/11. Sadly, President Bush has been second-guessed on almost every move he made post 9/11.

    It is so simple to be a Monday morning quarterback. Almost every politician from either major party has second-guessed Bush, most with malice. Bush promised all would be different if he was elected and that promise was kept.

  • Open letter to legislators

    To the editor: After I received my tax bill I noted the Calabash fire fee had increased from $50 to $100.

    I called the tax office and was told, "The legislators voted for the increase."

    So this is why we send you there? To vote a 100 percent increase mostly to the senior citizens on fixed income? Did our homes get any larger? Or did our cost of living increase?

    What is the logic in your actions?

    It's outrageous elected officials can act with no consideration.

  • Booze It and Lose It, similiar programs keep roads safe

    Between Aug. 17 and Sept. 3 last year, there were more than 500 alcohol-related crashes on North Carolina roads. Twenty-seven people were killed and more than 400 were injured.

    In an effort to lower those numbers and help keep roads safe, law enforcement officers throughout the state participated in a recent Booze It & Lose It campaign. Local and state law enforcement stepped up patrols throughout the Labor Day holiday weekend to make sure drunk drivers stayed off local roads, and quickly apprehended those who decided to drink and drive.

  • Remembering N.C.'s most determined journalist

    A salute with a cramped, arthritis-ridden writing hand for the 150th anniversary of the first publication from the man the N.C. Press Association calls the state’s most determined journalist, John McLean Harrington.

    I stumbled upon the story of this remarkable writer, reporter, editor and publisher while perusing the association’s Web site and learned his unique story.

    According to a story Michael Ray Smith, Harrington (1839-1887) produced 299 newspapers in his lifetime, and get this—all by hand.

  • The Civil War years at Ocean Isle Beach (1860 to 1865)

    Ocean Isle Beach saw a good deal of Civil War naval action between blockade-runners of the Confederacy and gunboats of the Union Navy.

    Confederate solders were stationed along Ocean Isle Beach to protect blockade-runners using Tubbs Inlet or Shallotte Inlet. If a blockade-runner had to be beached to avoid capture, the ship’s crew would frantically unload cargo while the land soldiers held off Union gunboats.

    North Carolina provided more troops to the Confederacy than any other state, and many of these soldiers came from Brunswick County.