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Today's Opinions

  • Annexation laws are needed

    To the editor: In a recent Brunswick Beacon article, Rep. Bonner Stiller stated that any law allowing the taking of, or annexing any property should be revisited more often than every 49 years.

    Firstly, the word “taking” should not even be in any consideration of annexation law; there is no taking.

    Secondly, the annexation law has been revisited by the N.C. General Assembly at least four times over the last five decades (S.L.1967-954, S.L. 1983e,36 & 768, S.L. 1998-150, and S.L. 2001-487), and each time the law was amended significantly, most recently in 2001.

  • Family says thank you for support

    To the editor: Jerry W. Jones and family would like to thank everyone for the outpouring of love that you have shown us during my battle with leukemia.

    Your prayers, the barbecue benefit, the blood drive and all the acts of love are very much appreciated and have touched our hearts deeply.

    Please continue to pray for us.

  • Responders saved building

    To the editor: I would like to take this public opportunity to thank the town of Shallotte and Ocean Isle Beach fire departments and Det. Eric King of the Shallotte Police Department for a job well done.

    In the early morning hours of June 5, a bottle rocket (fireworks) landed on the roof of the Red Apple Professional Building and sparked a roof fire.

    In addition, a piece of burning material landed on a sprinkler pipe and caused a piece of it to melt, creating a flood of water.

  • Congressman says he fights for public rights

    To the editor: A recent writer apparently did not realize I have consistently fought to protect the First Amendment rights of religious broadcasters.

    In fact, I was invited to speak at the National Association of Religious Broadcasters convention when it was in Charlotte.

    Just as the writer and many others do in our area, I enjoy listening to Christian radio and regularly tune in as I travel through our district.

    Freedom of information and speech are essential to our democracy, and that includes freedom of religious expression as well.

  • Find fresh food, crafts and treats in new location

    This Saturday, the Shallotte Farmers Market will move from the town hall parking lot to Lions Club Park beside Shallotte Plaza on Main Street. It will give the public easier access to vendors and the vendors a more comfortable, shadier spot for selling.

    My daughter and I went to the last market day at town hall last Saturday to talk to a few people and get photos for an upcoming story for the Beacon’s Island Living magazine.

    She served as my sidekick, writing her own “notes” as I made the rounds from table to table.

  • Ray Gilbert, a Libertarian?

    Why not? He has been a Democrat, and then a Republican, and now he is a Libertarian.

    Mr. Gilbert’s decision to run in the general election as a libertarian is a legal, albeit sneaky, way to circumvent being tossed out of office.

  • When did we stop caring for all mankind, especially in times of need?

    When did we get so busy, so self-involved, that as humans we have forgotten compassion and how to care for one another?

    In recent months news accounts have told the stories of men and women who have been struck by very unfortunate circumstances and left to suffer—and in some cases die—while others offered no help.

    The most recent incident involves a woman in New York who went to the right place to get help—a hospital.

  • Bravery was on display last week in Brunswick County courtroom

    I saw bravery last week in the faces of two 20-something women.

    Two young women, just out of college, should be busy decorating their new apartments and going out with friends, not testifying in a rape trial.

    But these two young women, now 22 and 23 years old, came back to Brunswick County to testify in the trial of a man who kidnapped and raped them seven years ago.

    They took the stand and with explicit detail relived the worst night of their lives to a judge, three lawyers, 12 jurors and the man who did it.