.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Gore leaves lasting legacy

    It might have been easier for Edward Mannon Gore to simply live in the shadow of his father, who founded the town where he spent most of his life.

    Instead, Ed Gore chose to not only build upon the legacy of Mannon C. Gore, but also leave his own mark on Sunset Beach, Brunswick County and North Carolina.

    After graduating from what is now East Carolina University with a bachelor’s degree in business administration, the Longwood native served our county in the Air Force where he monitored Russian radio transmissions during the Cold War before returning home.

  • Hewett’s death a tragic ending to a sad story

    Any journalist with an ounce of compassion does not delight in reporting an event like the death of former Brunswick County Sheriff Ronald Hewett.

    Hewett’s story is familiar to most long-time residents. When he first became sheriff in 1994 at age 31, he was the youngest to be elected to the office in North Carolina. Hewett’s leadership heralded a new era for the sheriff’s office, which was stinging from Herman Strong’s resignation following his conviction on federal drug-smuggling and conspiracy charges.

  • You decide: Can we remake ourselves?

    By Dr. Mike Walden

    Guest Columnist

    Some say the next several decades will be the “age of remakes.”

    I don’t mean old films that have new versions produced, nor do I mean personal style remakes –– like new clothes and a new hair fashion –– although most would agree I certainly need the latter. Instead, I mean an “occupational remake,” where a person literally restructures what he or she does to earn a living.

  • District 8 Senate update

    By Sen. Bill Rabon

    Guest Columnist

    Editor’s note: The Beacon has tried for 14 weeks to reach Sen. Bill Rabon by phone and email for comment about Senate Bill 215, which lists him as the bill’s primary sponsor and calls for the state “to abolish the office of coroner in Brunswick County.” Senate Bill 215 was reported favorable to the Senate’s standing committee on health care and re-referred to the Senate Judiciary I Committee on March 31.

  • District 17 House update

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    Last week in the North Carolina General Assembly, the House passed a gun rights bill after much debate; we passed a bill improving the Voter ID system for 2016; we passed a bill benefitting our local government’s health plans; and the Senate passed its version of the state budget.

    The weather in Raleigh last week continued to be very hot outside with record temperatures and humidity. The debate on such issues as the gun rights bill and the budget kept temperatures inside at a high level, also.

  • Volunteers brighten small children’s lives

    It truly takes a generous person to offer time, a caring concern and a commitment to brighten the life of a small child.

    That is what our wonderful volunteers do once a month at our diaper giveaway event. These are moms helping moms from all walks of life, contributing items for the less fortunate by donating diapers, wipes, baby clothing and other needed items. These volunteers are special individuals.

  • Overspending of tax dollars has to stop

    To the editor:

    According to a column by Walter Williams in The (Wilmington) Star-News, three out of 10 whites and 7.2 out of 10 African-American children in our country are born to unwed mothers.

    Why are taxpayers paying for these children and their mothers (a high percentage of them) and the fathers are not? Our courts are not doing their job and the Department of Social Services is not doing theirs. Is it now morally right for this to happen?

  • Food inspectors needed

    To the editor:

    Americans are getting more and more of their food from overseas, but we are not inspecting nearly enough of it. Eighty percent of the shrimp and other seafood we get are now obtained from foreign sources, along with two-thirds of all the fruits and vegetables Americans eat every day.

    Despite these huge percentages, we inspect less than 2 percent of our food imports. We need more inspectors to keep our food supply safe from contaminated foreign food.