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Features

  • Rourk Library Book Club will be reading local writer Anne Barnhill’s short story collection, “What You Long For,” for its September selection.

    The session, which is open to the public, will take place at 1 p.m. Monday, Sept. 14, in the conference room of the library at 5068 Main St. in Shallotte.

    Barnhill’s short story, “Produce,” which is included in the collection, was recently produced by the North Carolina Touring Troupe in Greensboro.

    Readers can find a copy of the book in the library or at Amazon.com.

  • The Brunswick County Branch of the NAACP is hosting its annual Freedom Fund Banquet, “Redeem the Dream,” on Saturday, Sept. 12, at Brunswick Community College’s South Brunswick Islands Center, 9400 U.S. 17 W. in Carolina Shores.

    The event begins with dinner at 6 p.m.

    Keynote speaker will be Kristi Hyman-Jones, chief of staff for the North Carolina Department of Justice.

    Master of Ceremonies will be the Rev. Dr. Terry L. Henry, senior pastor at Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church in Wilmington.

  •  IF YOU GO

    What: SBI Rotary Club Chilled & Grilled Food and Wine Celebration

    When: 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 16

    Where: Dinah E. Gore Fitness and Aquatics Center, Brunswick Community College

    Cost: $5 at door, plus additional amount for food tickets

    Get ready to get chilled and grilled next Wednesday night.

  •  When things happen in your life, do you react by creating a story in your head about those events?

    You may not realize it. Like most of us, though, you probably do this automatically. And everything takes off from there. Ask me how I know. 

     

    What’s your story?

  •  Dogs are remarkable creatures. From the tip of their cold noses to the ends of their wagging tails, canine anatomy is as beautiful and graceful as it is unique and fascinating. The mouth, teeth and skull of dogs are incredibly well adapted to meet the needs of one of nature’s most perfectly designed scavengers. The oral cavity of the dog is also the source of many myths and misunderstandings that lead to some potentially serious problems.

    Here are some of the most common, interesting and important dental questions I’m regularly asked in my practice:

  •  By John Nelson

    Tall, stately and beautiful — three adjectives that describe this week’s mystery plant.

  •  “It’s your decision.” Few words can bring about such power and such fear.

    For a big part of my life, I weighed every decision very carefully. Then I learned it’s often better to get into action than to ponder things too long.

    While it’s good to consider options, it’s also wise to make decisions more quickly and move on. Whether it’s right or wrong, at least I’m in motion. If not, inertia can set in. I like to opt for “ertia,” the informal opposite of inertia.

     

  •  A reader recently asked if dogs can become depressed, develop mental illness, and if “doggie psychologists” were for real. For those of you looking for the short answers: 1) Yes, but maybe not exactly like you’re thinking; 2) Absolutely; and 3) Yes, with an enormous caveat. If you’d like a little more thorough explanation, read on pet lovers.

  • By John Nelson

    Not a morning person? Here’s a plant that loves the morning.

    You can see this species just about anywhere in the eastern USA, from Pennsylvania to Florida, over to Texas, into the Midwestern states and well into Latin America. It is frequently seen on field margins, roadsides and in ditches, and it seems to like sandy places.

    This is a native American species, and a member of the largely tropical “spiderwort” family, a family that has given us plenty of showy ornamental garden and patio plants — and weeds.

  •  Not a morning person? Here’s a plant that loves the morning.

    You can see this species just about anywhere in the eastern USA, from Pennsylvania to Florida, over to Texas, into the Midwestern states and well into Latin America. It is frequently seen on field margins, roadsides and in ditches, and it seems to like sandy places.

    This is a native American species, and a member of the largely tropical “spiderwort” family, a family that has given us plenty of showy ornamental garden and patio plants — and weeds.

  • Join local band Bailout for a Labor Day-eve release party of its new CD, “Postcard — Greetings from Ocean Isle Beach,” at 8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 6, at Sharky’s Waterfront Restaurant, 61 Causeway Drive in Ocean Isle Beach.

    Bailout, also known as “The Band 2 Big 2 Fail,” is a local favorite renowned for playing the hits as well as original songs, which are showcased on the new CD.

  • Learn all you need to learn about life in the great outdoors, from mowing and growing to grilling and kayaking.

    Details on these topics and more will be available at The Brunswick Beacon’s first Outdoor Living Show scheduled from 9 a.m. to 2 .m. next Saturday, Sept. 12, at Shallotte Middle School.

    Admission is free to this indoor/outdoor show, which will highlight everything you can imagine for outdoor living and fun.

  • It’s the last of the Brunswick County Summer Concerts and Movies season, and what a season it’s been.

    The season launched in April with a performance by EBS Band in Southport, followed by many more scheduled shows and movies for the next five months in seven other Brunswick County towns/venues — Sunset Beach, Ocean Isle Beach, Oak Island, Holden Beach, Leland, Shallotte and Calabash.

  •  IF YOU GO

    What: Ocean Isle Beach Family Sand Sculpture Contest

    Where: on the beach behind Ocean Isle Beach Community Center at 44 E. First St.

    When: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 5

    How much: Free to participate and free to watch

    It’s an end-of-season chance to get crafty using the finest building materials known to creative beach hands.

  •  One of the most common questions I hear from pet owners is what is the best way to train their dog or cat. They are often confused by questionable “dominance” or “pack leader” techniques popular on reality television. They’ve been bamboozled by apparent quick fixes and magical cures for often complex animal behaviors an onscreen personality miraculously manages to correct within a 30-minute show. I wish.

  •  By John Nelson

  •  By Linda Arnold

     

    Off and on I’ve had to engage in the art of tough love. Now I know how it got its name! I’m just wondering whether it’s tougher on the receiver — or the sender.

    Tough love has been defined as “an expression used when someone treats another person harshly or sternly with the intent to help them in the long run.”

     

    Prunes Theory of Life

  • On the cusp of summer-into-Indian-summer, the Sunset Beach Business and Merchants Association is launching a weekly waterfront market starting Thursday, Sept. 3, and continuing through Oct. 29 in Sunset Beach Town Park.

    At the weekly Thursday market that will be open 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., shoppers will be able to purchase produce straight from the farmer and drink coffee brewed from beans home-roasted locally and delivered fresh to market.

  • By Linda Arnold

    Life Columnist

    So, you’ve had a spat with your spouse.  Or, your boss came down on you.  Finally, your kids got on your very last nerve.

    The conversation may not have been pretty, and it’s over. Do you find yourself replaying it over and over in your mind, though? Thinking ‘bout other things you could have said. Wondering how they’re reacting. Wishing you could have been more forceful — or more tactful.

    Why do we do this to ourselves?  And, is there a way to stop?

  • By John Nelson

    Plant Columnist

    Let’s talk about the carrot family, the Apiaceae.

    This is a very large family, known mostly from temperate parts of the northern hemisphere, with many genera and many species, these known since antiquity, and valued for a variety of foods, spices, flavors, and medicines … and poisons.