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Features

  • Middle-school-aged students interested in art have several camps to choose from this summer.

    Organized by the Brunswick Arts Council, the camps include one being offered at the Buddhist Temple on Midway Road in Bolivia, if enough students sign up.

    Four summer art camps are planned June 20 through June 23,

    The camps will enable students to work with local, professional artists to create an art project in three days that will be shown to parents and friends on the fourth day, a Saturday.

    A fifth summer art camp will be offered June 28-July 1.

  • Raise your margaritas—this Saturday, May 5, marks the 150th anniversary of Cinco de Mayo.

    Contrary to confusion, Cinco de Mayo is not a celebration of Mexican Independence Day, which isn’t until Sept. 16.

    Cinco de Mayo commemorates the outnumbered Mexican army’s surprise victory in 1862 over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-American War. In Mexico, the holiday is known as El Dia de la Batalla de Puebla(English translation: “The Day of the Battle of Puebla”).

  • OCEAN ISLE BEACH—If you’ve seen a periwinkle-colored bracelet with the words “Heartburn can cause cancer,” or “Nobody Fights Alone” you may have met an Ocean Isle Beach couple working to educate others about the dangers of esophageal cancer.

    Last September, Jay and Diane Middleton celebrated their grandson’s first birthday during Labor Day weekend. That weekend, Jay ate a deviled egg and immediately felt pain. Plagued by acid reflux issues and sleep apnea for years, he tried to ignore it.

  • Two greenhouses are bursting with vibrant plants of all colors on the Brunswick Community College campus, and they’re waiting for someone to come and take them home.

    There are also annuals and perennials of all sizes, shapes and colors.

    Students and staff in the college’s horticulture and turf grass management program have been working for weeks to cultivate plants for the fourth annual sale.

    The sale starts runs through Friday, April 27.

  • SHALLOTTE—Fresh fruits and vegetables are on their way to market in Shallotte.

    With warmer weather and the arrival of spring, flowers are blooming and it’s time to re-open Buddy Kelly’s Farmers Market in Shallotte.

    The first day of the 2012 season will be 8 a.m.-noon Saturday, April 28. Organizers are ready to open the market for its sixth season and hope to draw in larger crowds and more vendors than ever before.

    “We are looking for new vendors,” said Loretta Nauta with the Shallotte enhancement and events committee.

  • CALABASH—Three years ago, Johnny McCarty put words to paper to convey a true family story about his mother being abducted by her father back during the Great Depression in rural West Virginia.

  • CALABASH—Zumba Gold teacher Sara McGrail has Calabash VFW Post 7288 dancing these days.

    McGrail, who teaches the popular Latin-style exercise classes on Monday and Wednesdays nights and once-a-week yoga at the Post on Carter Drive, recently orchestrated a fundraiser to bring in more than $5,000 for the Wounded Warrior Project.

    McGrail organized silent and Chinese auctions April 15, raising $5,203 at last count to donate to Wounded Warriors through the Calabash VFW.

  • SHALLOTTE—Looking for something entertaining? How about starting the summer season off early with a new concert and car show series.

    Shallotte Commons is the place to be for the 2012 Summer Concert Series. The fun kicks off Saturday, April 21. There will be a car show featuring the Sun Coast Cruisers and a concert with the live music of Chuck Johnson, “The Charlyhorse.”

  • Nantucket Band, a longtime rock group formed in Jacksonville in 1969, will perform live in an outdoor concert 2-4 p.m. Saturday, April 28, in Holden Beach.

    The concert, Holden Beach Grassroots Presents Nantucket Live at Holden Beach, will take place in a field at 1305 Cedar Landing Road near Provision Company Restaurant on the mainland side of Holden Beach.

    Concert host Jabin Norris describes the event as a big concert that’s the same weekend as the two-day Days at the Docks at Holden Beach.

  • SUNSET BEACH—Bill and Maggie Ehling have known each other a long time.

    In fact, just this past Tuesday, April 17, the Sunset Beach couple celebrated a real milestone—their 60th wedding anniversary.

    At their Sunset Beach home where they’ve lived for the past 13 years, the couple enjoyed a few jokes and jabs and laughter as they told how they met—back in the 1950s when both were in the Army and stationed in Germany, working in communications.

  • Dinah E. Gore Fitness & Aquatics Center at Brunswick Community College has scheduled several fitness marathons next week to benefit Relay for Life.

    Those who are up for the fitness challenge are invited to participate. They just need to sign up ahead of time and pay varying registration fees that will be donated to Relay for Life.

    The events are every year right before Relay for Life, said Neil Smeigh, fitness specialist at the fitness & aquatics center.

     

    Swim, run, walk

  • Holden Beach is almost ready to bopple.

    The beach town’s annual bopple race, when numbered apples are released on the Intracoastal Waterway to determine cash winners, is just one of the highlights at this year’s Days at the Docks festivities Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29.

    Sponsored by the Greater Holden Beach Merchants Association, this year’s annual festival to kick off the spring season has returned to being a two-day event after taking place for just one day last year.

  • CALABASH—The Saltaire Quilters are at it again.

    Last week, the creative seamstresses once again presented worthy recipients with their latest array of handmade, colorful quilts.

    The quilts were given to representatives with Brunswick Novant Medical Center and Hope Harbor Home.

    Deborah Rochelle, guest services and volunteer manager at Brunswick Novant Medical Center, and Lynn Carlson, executive director of Hope Harbor Home, took turns choosing from among 22 hand-sewn quilts.

  • Many years ago, Museum of Coastal Carolina founder Stuart Ingram visited a well-known taxidermist in Fort Myers, Fla., who specialized in fish. To display his work in an impressive manner, this taxidermist had designed and built his own reef room.
    Ingram loved the reef room and showed it to his wife, Louise. They agreed to build a reef room in the Museum of Coastal Carolina to display the marine animals that frequent local waters. Many museum visitors have said the Ocean Reef Gallery is their favorite part of the museum.

  • In early spring, a long snake slithers its way across the sky. It rises just before sundown and pops up from the horizon much like the first earthly snakes of spring that rise from holes in the ground after a long winter’s nap.
    The snake in the sky takes six hours to climb fully above the horizon. On this snake’s back, a person can find some notable star groups. However, if snakes don’t do it for you, then check out the long trail of planets across the sky.

  • CALABASH—Somebody has been beating up on the old Granny Allyn’s Restaurant building.

    Several somebodies, in fact. The Calabash Fire Department has been using the former eatery for weekly fire training.

    During training most Monday nights, the department has been chopping roof holes for ventilation training, making entries with hoses, breaching walls, using ropes and smoking up the building with smoke machines. Just a few months ago, smoking wasn’t even allowed in the building when it was still a restaurant.

  • CALABASH—The date is forever etched in Terri Godwin’s mind—June 12, 2002.

    That’s the day she and her older sister, Natasha, both underwent surgery at Duke University Medical Center, the day one of Terri’s kidneys was deftly removed to give to her ailing sister.

    “There were a lot of emotions,” says Terri. “But we also had a lot of prayer. It really helped us get through.”

    Nearly 10 years later, both sisters are alive and thriving.

  • SUPPLY—A fundraising gala to benefit Brunswick Novant Medical Center Foundation has been will take place next Thursday, April 12.

    The black-tie optional event will begin with cocktails at 6:30 p.m. at 101 Stone Chimney Place in Supply. A seated dinner will follow at 7 p.m.

    Foundation director Amy Myers said the “Springtime in Paris” gala will benefit the hospital foundation, “whose mission is providing remarkable patient care to local residents.”

  • The entire county is invited to join a worldwide public environmental action event called Earth Hour.

    At 8:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31, millions of people around the globe are encouraged to switch off their lights for one hour. Participants are asked to make a commitment to go beyond the hour with actions that benefit the planet in the year ahead.

    Linda Rudick, member of Keep Brunswick County Beautiful, has coordinated efforts for Earth Hour in Brunswick County.

  • BOLIVIA—Taylor is an unusual duck—an odd duck, as Bob Campbell, budget director with the Brunswick County Health Department, refers to him.
    The black-and-white duck has been hanging out near the department for about a year, Campbell says.
    He’s not a bad duck—he doesn’t really cause any problems, except for his duck waste.
    “He makes messes on the sidewalk and doorway,” Campbell said. “Nobody wants to walk in that stuff. Other than that, he doesn’t bother anybody. I’ve seen him actually greet a few people as they come in.”