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Features

  • Wax myrtle (Morella cerifera) is a popular landscape tree and is often grown as a dense hedge for natural screening.

    It is one of the most versatile landscape plants in southeastern North Carolina, offering four seasons of beauty and service. It is a fine textured evergreen shrub or small tree. It will quickly reach heights of 15-25 feet. The narrow, evergreen leaves are a glossy, olive green and are quite aromatic when crushed, releasing a pleasant, spicy scent.

  • Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation (BEMC) invites local agencies and groups to apply for a 2010 BEMC Community Grant.

    The program was started in 2003 and provides grants up to $2,500 to groups that provide: family services programs, civic and community programs, cultural and arts programs, emergency services and community development activities. Since inception, the grants program has awarded nearly $168,000 to more than 100 projects benefiting citizens all over the area.

  • Judy and Clifton Riley of Calabash celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Dec. 18, 2009. Their daughter, Susan Suggs, gave a reception in their honor at The Lighthouse Mission Church in Calabash.

  • Do you remember that ditty from years past, the one that began with the words: “Tell me a story before I fall asleep?” I do. Every once in a while, it bubbles up from the recesses of my mind, and I smile.

    I smile because life is all about telling stories. You tell me your story. I tell you mine. We share the commonality we find in them and make connections, as we can, to the larger story of humanity and divinity. This cosmic tale remains a mystery to be entered and probed.

  • Looking for something new, active and fit to do in 2010?

    Try moving your feet to music.

    Instructors are stepping up with an array of dance classes in a variety of styles, from beginner to advanced, throughout Brunswick County.

    Every day of the week, students are dancing somewhere at an area venue.

  • LOCKWOOD FOLLY--Friendly competition, camaraderie and fun are the main reasons people enjoy shooting pool, and for a group of friends in this golf course community, another reason is neighbor Bob Marston’s new billiards room.

    The group of about a half-dozen Lockwood Folly residents plays three nights a week, and Marston’s friends say the night they enjoy most is when he hosts the game.

  • CALABASH—Sunset River Marketplace is featuring paintings by watercolor artist Richard Staat in a show titled “Watercolors with a Transparent Touch,” from Jan. 11 through Feb. 20.

    The eclectic exhibition includes figural pieces as well as landscapes and coastal scenes. A reception, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 16.

  • The December meeting of the Coastal Carolina Camera Club combined a potluck dinner with a juried competition of members’ photographs representing “December Holidays.” Winners were chosen in three divisions: Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced.

    Beginners Division

    First place: Bob Boal–‘4th Advent before Christmas.’

    Second place: Mary Wayne–‘Mother Nature’s Ornaments.’

    Third place: Fran Sheehan–‘Old St. Nick.’

    Intermediate Division

  • The world hailed 2009 as the “International Year of Astronomy,” and across the globe, special events honored the occasion.

    Even the stars and planets seemed to join in the yearlong tribute: Jupiter took a hit from some space junk; Saturn’s rings disappeared for a few days as they faced us edge-on. Our moon gave up a deep secret; there is water on its surface.

  • Rattlesnakes may be hanging out waiting for warmer temperatures, but now is the time to deal with rattlesnake weed. Also known as Florida artichoke and Florida betony, this member of the mint family rears its ugly head in February when a few warm days get it growing.

    Atrazine, which is sold as Purge, does a pretty good job of controlling Florida betony in centipede and St. Augustine lawns. The only material that has any activity on this aggressive weed in shrub beds is diclobenil, sold as Casoron or Barrier.

  • Bluebirds are flying over the area in search of accommodations. It’s a little early, but like some other smart animals, it’s time to plan ahead.

    Bluebirds are particular in their nesting habits. Don Adams of Southport has provided the following information on how to attract these beautiful little birds to your garden:

    Cavity nesting bluebirds are in need of man-made nest boxes. The change from wood fence posts with cavities to steel posts and the cutting of hollow trees for firewood has reduced the natural nesting sites.

  • Jessica Lynn Edwards of Ash and William Allen Todd of Shallotte were married Dec. 5 at Camp Branch Baptist Church in Ash, with The Rev. Leroy Long officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Thea Barefoot of Ash and the late Wayne Edwards.

    The groom is the son of William Earl Todd and Wanda Todd of Shallotte.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her mother.

    Amy Fulford, the groom’s sister, served as matron of honor. She wore a black knee-length dress.

  • I watched as she squirmed in her chair. With a sigh that mingled desperation with frustration and anger with despair, she let her head drop to her chest. Then a sudden burst of energy and feisty combativeness grasped her and she shouted out, “I feel trapped. Don’t any of you understand? I feel trapped. I am being treated like a baby. I have lost control of my life. I am in a hole and I can’t get out!”

  • One of The Brunswick Beacon’s most loyal readers does not live in Brunswick County. In fact, he doesn’t even live in America.

    His name is Glyn Roberts.

    Originally from England, he now lives in France and keeps tabs on all things Brunswick County by reading The Brunswick Beacon online every day.

  • I was considering an article about gardener’s New Year’s resolutions, so I entered that into a search engine. Not much popped up, but a group of Master Gardeners from Maryland had numerous posts about planting native trees and shrubs.

    This “native-only” stance has stirred something akin to religious fervor in some plant circles. I don’t have anything against native trees and shrubs, but I still think using well-adapted plants no matter where they come from is a better idea.

  • To start out the New Year right, sign up for gardening class at Brunswick Community College and/or take a seminar offered by the extension center. There is always new information coming out that will help you with your gardening skills and it’s a great way to meet more gardeners.

  • After scrounging around the kitchen for one last holiday goodie, you find a single sugar cookie hiding in the bottom tin. You grab it, and head toward the mountain of decorations that need to be packed away until next year. Several hours later, the last box has been shoved into the attic or garage. Surveying the house, you see that all the gifts have been put away and everything appears to be back to normal, finally.

  • The Roman god Janus, whose name we adopted for our month January, fastidiously guarded doorways, offering safe entry and exit from ancient homes. He looked forward and backward to ensure all was well.

    In the same way, we take time annually to gaze upon the departure of the past 12 months and to look with eager anticipation to the coming year. We offer ourselves the gift of remembering, not simply for its own sake but so that we might empower positive change in the future.

  • The Christmas season is definitely lit up at the home of Gilbert and Joyce Ouellette in the Village at Calabash in Carolina Shores. Neighbor Richard Girard said Ouellette has been decorating his Palm Court home for years and gets a little more extravagant each holiday season.

     

  • SUPPLY—Susan Jagodzinski didn’t know her dog was pregnant.

    But she soon found out after adopting Sasha, a mixed-breed shepherd, from Brunswick County Animal Shelter in October.

    “She was fat; we didn’t think anything about it,” Jagodzinski said five days after Sasha delivered 13 puppies at Jagodzinski’s home in Supply.

    The “baker’s dozen” of puppies were born in the wee hours Nov. 28, two days after Thanksgiving.