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Features

  • Ocean Isle Beach—Even as an unusual early-summer heat wave sets in, guests and employees at The Winds Resort Beach Club don’t mind at all—as long as they can hang out at the pool, enjoy drinks at the tiki bar and walk onto the strand whenever the mood strikes.

  • Coastal Living Magazine has picked Calabash Seafood Hut as having the best seafood on the East Coast in this month’s magazine.

    “I think the long lines out on the benches speak for itself,” Calabash Mayor Anthony Clemmons said. “It’s the hottest little spot in Calabash.”

    Calabash Seafood Hut is a small restaurant—it can only seat about 65 people in the dining area—but that has not stopped customers from waiting outside.

  • BOLIVIA—For every defendant who goes through Teen Court, one less defendant goes through Brunswick County’s criminal justice system—alleviating an over-burdened justice system.

    Teen Court is funded through state grants, not county funded, so it saves Brunswick County taxpayer money, Teen Court Director Glenda Ansley said.

    But of all the ways Teen Court benefits the court system and the taxpayers, Ansley said it benefits the participants—defendants and volunteers—the most.

  • The summer’s sky is full of many bright stars. The reason is simple: At the start of summer, the main plane of the Milky Way Galaxy is just above the horizon, and as the calendar approaches the middle of the summer season, the Milky Way’s main plane moves to the middle of the sky.

    More stars are along the main plane than below or above the plane; therefore, it is the position of the main plane that fills the sky with stars.

  • Artists from throughout the Carolinas, from the mountains to the coast, have brought their paintings and pottery to downtown Southport’s Franklin Square Gallery for its annual Summer Regional Show that opened June 21 and continues until July 17.

    This juried exhibition highlights the work of already well known artists in Brunswick and New Hanover counties and many others from throughout North and South Carolina.

  • When she worked as director of a cancer center in Akron, Ohio, Linda Herrick met a number of people who had no idea what to do after they lost their spouses and loved ones.

    “I felt so bad for the widows,” Herrick said. “Some of them didn’t even know how to write checks…I decided then that when I retired, I would give back.”

    Since moving to Brunswick County in 2000, Herrick, who now lives in Shallotte’s Brierwood community, has done just that.

  • Silver Coast Winery is once again showcasing the metal artistry of David McCune during the summer season.

    The show launches Saturday, June 19, and runs through Sept. 14.

    McCune, of Fayetteville and Brunswick County, is recognized as a prolific artist who has had successful shows from Florida to Las Vegas.

  • Since moving to Southport, the one word Larry Maisel always hears when people describe his adopted hometown is “quaint.”

    People from all over Brunswick County and around the state enjoy strolling downtown, browsing antique shops and eating at seafood restaurants in the small, charming town along the Cape Fear River.

    But the picturesque Southport of today is different than its early days as an industrial town, where canning plants, lumber mills, boat repair facilities and shrimp houses lined the now scenic, tourist-friendly waterfront.

  •  There are plenty of hot sunny days ahead as we head into summer. During spring of this year, we had a few days that gave us a taste of the hot days to come. With the summer approaching, here are a few Sun facts to think about next time you are in the sun getting a suntan and avoiding the dreaded over sun exposure, sunburn. Here’s to the power of the Sun.

  • ST. JAMES—The Cape Fear Repertory Theatre members waited a few more months than they originally planned, but at 8 p.m. Thursday, the company’s production of “The Sensuous Senator” will debut at the now-open-and-legal Playhouse 211 near Southport.

    Playhouse 211 is Brunswick County’s newest entertainment venue and was supposed to open for the repertory company and other interested groups to rent in January, but the owners encountered some unexpected zoning issues, resulting in a change of plans.

  • Lorie Burcham was already busy baking elaborate cakes in coastal Carolina with her thriving six-year-old business, Crumb de la Crumb.

    Then her cousin, Shane Stevens, a songwriter and fellow Brunswick County native, summoned Burcham to Nashville.

    He said she could make a lot more money crafting cakes in Music City.

  • The youngest ambassadors of peace and joy, the African Children’s Choir (ACC), performs at 7 p.m. Friday, June 4, in Odell Williamson Auditorium.

    These are children from the poorest countries of the world, whose voices have been heard by world leaders and top performers in the entertainment world and, for the past 25 years, have raised millions of dollars to educate and rebuild countries devastated by famine, war and AIDS.

  • “Cycles: The Songs of a Lifetime” a musical revue celebrating the various stages of life and love, will premier at 8 p.m. Friday, May 21, at Franklin Square Park in Southport. The show is set for May 21-23 and May 28-30.

    “Cycles” will be the seventh free musical revue Brunswick Little Theatre has performed in the park “as a gift to the community,” according to director Jonathan Richmond.

  • Up-and-coming country artist Logan Murrell will perform in concert at 7 p.m. next Tuesday, May 18, at Odell Williamson Auditorium on the campus of Brunswick Community College.

    The teen performed most recently at numerous events at the Azalea Festival in Wilmington.

  • Necole Daniels, a pharmacy technician from Shallotte, will appear on the May 13 episode of “Wheel of Fortune.”

    Daniels tried out for the show at a “Wheelmobile” event in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

    “I’ve always watched ‘Wheel of Fortune,’ since I was able to watch TV,” she said. “I’ve always enjoyed playing along. It was my dream to go on there.

    “Once I got there, it was all that I thought it would be and more, and I would definitely go back. It was the experience of a lifetime.

  • The West Brunswick Theatre Arts Department will perform "Tragic Remodeling," at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 20, and 7 p.m. Thursday, May 20, and Friday, May 21, at the West Brunswick High School theatre.

    Adapted from classic dramas, "Tragic Remodeling" includes six short dramas written, produced and directed by students. The classics have been turned into contemporary works directed by students Allie Worthington, Cammy Dunn, Emily Smigiel, Hayley Young, Beth Henson and Jon Hill.

  • SUNSET BEACH—Monday mornings, the Sea Trail Grandmas gather at the Pink Palace meeting room with bagfuls of pastel-hued cloth and yarn.
    Before you know it, they’re in stitches as they work on an array of hand-knit hats and blankets and cloth “coddlers” for newborn preemies.
    That’s the mission of this club, which is in an infancy of its own.
    Michele Lupien is their leader, club member Peg Jones says, and the one who put it together.

  • Isaac Hardy is a familiar sight around downtown Shallotte.

    Just ask local real estate agent Doug Terhune, who struck up a friendship with the 71-year-old resident of Shallotte Assisted Living about four years ago.

    Terhune, who regularly eats breakfast at the Purple Onion Café on Main Street, started noticing the fit, elderly man who would stop in at the Shallotte eatery during his routine walks through town.

  • Lucille Lewis has been volunteering every Monday for nearly 10 years at Sheltered Treasures Thrift Store in Calabash.

    The Little River, S.C., resident sorts clothes, making sure each item looks fresh, tags them and places them on a rack in the spacious shop. She purges the racks of clothes that have been around too long and helps customers find what they’re looking for.

  •  Gospel artists conclude international tour Saturday at Odell Williamson Auditorium

     

    Following their successful pairing on the 30-city “Come Alive” Tour last fall, platinum-selling and Dove award-winning artists Mark Schultz and Point of Grace hit the road together again this spring for an additional 25 cities.