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Features

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    There is going to be a party and the entire county is invited.

    Relay for Life of Brunswick County is kicking off events for 2012 Relay for Life with a Carnival for a Cure party at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, at the Dinah E. Gore Fitness & Aquatics Center.

    At the helm of this year’s executive committee are Alicia Sides, Gloria Childress, Melissa Yow and Dee Carlisle. This is the group’s first year working together and they hope to spread Relay awareness.

  • SUPPLY—Paula Deen breezed into Brunswick County this past Saturday, charming locals and out-of-towners as the Georgia-born cooking star took part in a scholarship fundraiser for Brunswick Community College.

    “Hello, y’all,” the Food Network star greeted upon entering a $500-per-person VIP luncheon in the Virginia Williamson Event Center of Odell Williamson Auditorium, attended by a limited guest group of 60.

  • OCEAN ISLE BEACH—Promptly at noon Sunday, festival-goers stood in judgment as they lined up to sample eight creative concoctions at the annual oyster stew cook-off at the North Carolina Oyster Festival.

    Set up beneath a tent were eight competing restaurants and chefs stirring up their respective stews. The competition was hot—and possibly spicy, with a variety of ingredients complementing one shared, central component at the annual festival—delectable oysters.

  •  SUPPLY/SHALLOTTE—No, it wasn’t your imagination. A man dressed as Jesus was walking down N.C. 130 on Tuesday.

    Drivers on N.C. 130 from Supply to Shallotte had to slow as three men dressed as Biblical figures walked more than 5 miles to raise awareness for the upcoming Men at the Cross conference and prayer event.

  • SHALLOTTE—Imagine a life with no phone, no money, no computer, no food and no shelter.

    For 24 hours, starting this Friday, Brunswick Family Assistance will take 15 people from the community and strip them of everything they own.

    They will be placed in a homeless village and will live as homeless people in Brunswick County.

    The Homeless Village is a way for BFA to bring attention to poverty and homelessness in the county, said Carol Phelps, executive director.

  • “Bottoms up” this time of year might cause a person to think about an October fest party and tippin’ back your favorite brew. And this time of year a person may also consider an astronomical bottom, which is just as nice as an ice-cold brew.
    The moon seems extra bright this time of year, and as a bonus, you can view the king of the planets right next to it this week.

  • VARNAMTOWN—With the 57th anniversary of Hurricane Hazel coming up this weekend, Marlene Varnam has a priceless memento to help her remember.

    Tucked in a room of her house is a pinewood chest-of-drawers that her late husband, Carson Varnam, salvaged from the Lockwood Folly River when Hazel wrought her destruction on North Carolina on Oct. 15, 1954.

  •  BY EILEEN HENDERSON

    SPECIAL TO THE BEACON

    Marlissa Dillon is a 21-year cancer survivor. She is not defined by this but inspired by the strength and courage she sees in other survivors and those just learning about their illness and those going through treatments.

    Marlissa is a mother, grandmother, sister and friend. She is also a performer, business owner and entrepreneur. Many years ago, Marlissa opened a day spa called Marlissa and Company in Calabash.

  • ASH—Scott Spencer strides into the ring, releasing his hold on his latest equine student who proceeds to trot circles around him.

    The horse, a petite, dun-hued gelding named Postell, comes from a rare, historic bloodline. Postell is a Carolina Marsh Tacky, an agile breed that’s become the state horse of South Carolina, centuries after aiding Revolutionary War hero Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion.

  • The most important decision you make for your pet
    Pet owners and veterinarians are always looking for that one tip, trick or advancement that will help pets live longer, healthier lives. Me, too. And I found it.
    The most important decision you make each day for your pet is what you feed it. Same goes for us. Of all the variables in life we can control, diet and nutrition have the greatest influence on health. Want your pet to live longer? Feed it well. You want to be functional well into your eighties? Start with how you’re fueling your body.

  •  OCEAN ISLE BEACH—Operation Marry Me Military is in full action mode as the big day draws near.

    The new nonprofit started by Oak Island’s Alecia Geddings is off to a grand start for its inaugural year. The 10-year goal is to marry 100 active military personnel on Veterans Day across the state.

    This year Brunswick County is home to two beach weddings. Event planner Brittany Adams of Brittany Adams O’Neil Events of Ocean Isle Beach and Michelle Rose are coordinating the Operation Marry Me Military event for southern Brunswick County.

  • Fall is upon us, and temperatures and leaves are falling. Even a satellite fell, because gravity affects us all. Some satellites can get a gravity whip and instead of coming back to earth, the gravity whip sends it flying while saving fuel. Thanks, gravity.
    Voyager 1 and 2 are such satellites, and with a little practice, you can tell where both objects are just by looking for the constellations with the moving parts.

  •   BRUNSWICK COUNTY—She has been growing collard greens for more than 30 years, but never has she grown them as tall as this year.

    Velma Williams planted collard greens in her garden last spring, just like she does every year. Only this year, they never seemed to stop growing.

    Last week Williams measured them. The tallest one in her garden is 56 inches in height.

  • CALABASH—It’s a corner nook, just waiting for browsers to come and discover delights that await within.

    One of them is All About the Carolinas, a shop tucked away inside the Low Country Stores complex where browsers can find an array of items made in the Carolinas.

    Shop owner Sally Pennington says she’s trying to feature items made exclusively in North or South Carolina.

    “I thought it would be a real challenge to find things, but no,” says Pennington, tending to gift baskets behind the counter of her boutique.

  • Filmmakers are scheduled to be in Sunset Beach this week.

    Susan Silk, marketing coordinator for the Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium, said a film company is supposed to be at the planetarium in Sunset Beach this Wednesday, Sept. 28.

    Hallmark Hall of Fame is producing a made-for-TV movie to air via ABC-TV in January, according to Silk.

  • CALABASH—It’s a corner nook, just waiting for browsers to come and discover delights that await within.

    One of them is All About the Carolinas, a shop tucked away inside the Low Country Stores complex where browsers can find an array of items made in the Carolinas.

    Shop owner Sally Pennington says she’s trying to feature items made exclusively in North or South Carolina.

    “I thought it would be a real challenge to find things, but no,” says Pennington, tending to gift baskets behind the counter of her boutique.

  • CALABASH—Wherever Mary Keefe goes, Buddy the cat often goes. If he feels like it.

    It’s been this way for the past eight-and-a-half years, when Keefe, owner of the Yardbird Emporium in the Low Country Stores complex, helped rescue Buddy and his two kitten siblings from under the store’s porch at 10138 Beach Drive.

    Mary took Mini, one of Buddy’s sisters, home to live with her. The proprietor of the former Martelle’s Flag Store took the other feline sister, Miss Kitty.

  • Ten years later, Americans who vowed never to forget Sept. 11, 2001, have kept their promise.

    Ten years ago, the country came to a halt and American lives changed forever as terrorist-directed planes crashed into the World Trade Center Twin Towers in New York, the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., and a rural field near Shanksville, Pa.

    Nearly 3,000 lives were lost that day, including 343 New York City Fire Department firefighters, 60 New York City and Port Authority officers, and eight emergency medical technicians and paramedics.

  • Gwen Grady couldn’t believe the cheerful patient she had met at Brunswick Universal Healthcare was more than a century old.

    That’s because Mae Smicklas, who turns 102 on Sept. 26, is youthful for her age.

    Grady, activity director at the Bolivia facility, recently met Smicklas when the centenarian was brought there for recovery after a recent fall.

    “I was just amazed at how sharp she is,” said Grady, recalling how Smicklas said, “No, I don’t need any reminders” about taking her medicine.

  • On a peaceful summer afternoon—so peaceful you could almost hear the Shallotte River ripple—World War II veteran Hector McNeill relaxed in one of the rocking chairs on his front porch overlooking the world at Shallotte Point.

    “My father was raised here,” said the Whiteville resident, who also owns a couple of historic houses at Shallotte Point, the historic, scenic convergence of the Shallotte River and Intracoastal Waterway three miles south of Shallotte.