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Features

  • The Brunswick Community College Foundation and Coastal Financial Associates are bringing renowned violinist Caroline Goulding accompanied on piano by Alicja Basinska and Janine Randall, with special guests The Sea Notes Choral Society of Brunswick County, to Odell Williamson Auditorium at 6 p.m. Jan. 9.

    All proceeds from the event will benefit student scholarships at Brunswick Community College. General admission tickets are $25 and VIP tickets, including a post-show reception and priority reserved seating, are $50.

  • Shanna (ID No. A014523) is a tan female Labrador retriever and Vizsla mix. The staff at Brunswick County Animal Shelter thinks she’s about 2 years old. She has been at the shelter since Oct. 14. The shelter’s adoption fees are based on age. Adoption fees for dogs are $65 for ages six months or older, and $46 for dogs five months old or younger. Fees include rabies shot, physical exam, heartworm test (for older dogs only) and spay or neuter. Female cats and kittens, $55; includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV (feline HIV) tests, rabies vaccination and spay surgery.

  • Nostalgic paintings by Stokes County artist Tony Craig are being featured in an exhibit, “Stepping Back In Time,” at Sunset River Marketplace in Calabash from Monday, Nov. 16, through Saturday, Jan. 9, 2010.

    An artist reception for Craig is set for 2-5 p.m. this coming Saturday, Nov. 21, during which Craig will also sign copies of his book.

    Working tightly in watercolor, Craig has captured moments in time at corner stores and country gas stations—places that are quickly disappearing from the landscape.

  • Uniquely Brunswick County

    Think Outside the Beach Photo Contest

    The Brunswick Beacon wants to know what you think makes Brunswick County unique. Pick up a camera and show us in this year's photo contest.

    The contest is divided into three divisions:

    Kids Division (Ages 12 and younger), Teen Division (Ages 13-18) and Adults (Ages 19 and older)

    There is an entry fee of $5 per photo in the adult division. Kids and teens divisions are free. Participants may enter as many photos as they wish.

  • Autumn sparkles with golden yellows and vibrant reds as our deciduous trees settle in for their winter nap.

    People from across the globe make the pilgrimage to New England, the upper Midwest and even the mountains of North Carolina to enjoy nature’s spectacle.

  • The trend toward cooler weather is welcomed by most of us but it can be accompanied by some unwelcome insect visitors.

    Polistes or paper wasp colonies are beginning to die out and so some of the remaining workers (who will croak eventually) along with next year’s crop of queens are likely to start bailing out of nests.

  • Pamela W. Dew and husband Christopher of Ocean Isle Beach and Gary L. Bozeman of Shallotte announce the engagement of their daughter, Denise A. Bozeman, to Jeremy C. Dixon, son of Donni Dixon of Alcolu, S.C., and Terry C. Dixon of New Bern. A July 10, 2010, wedding is planned at Abilena Plantation on the Neuse River in New Bern.

  • Mr. and Mrs. Jack McRoberts of Ocean Isle Beach announce the engagement of their daughter, Jennifer Helene McRoberts, to Darren Michael Otto, both of Charlotte. A May wedding is planned.

  • I was in a gloomy mood, alerting my husband to the fact I really did not want to view anything that engaged my brain and ready to succumb only to mind-numbing television programs. But the set was tuned to Book TV and I got hooked on a program featuring Dr. Kit Yarrow and her recently published book, “GenBuy.” What I learned gave me pause, to say the least.

  •  

    Cuc-a-lor-us: 1. a film set apparatus placed in front of a light source to create a dappled lighting effect on a subject or background. 2. a film festival set in Wilmington

    Cucalorus is celebrating its 15th anniversary this week as an international film festival in the historic port city of Wilmington.

    Named one of the “Top 25 Coolest Film Festivals” by Moviemaker Magazine, the festival is non-competitive to create a laid-back atmosphere and foster open dialogue, where filmmakers and audiences feel free to share stories and socialize.

  • With more than 30 years of experience painting colorful advertisements for golf courses, restaurants and all kinds of small businesses, Shallotte’s Buddy Norris will always call himself a sign painter.

    He hand paints signs and posters for friends and family members and for himself—just to keep his creative juices flowing—but the realities of the business have changed. These days, customers prefer letters designed on computers and cut out on vinyl.

  • The stars marked a change of seasons for early man. For modern man, the store shelves mark the changing seasons. We just watched as Halloween turned into Thanksgiving and Christmas on store shelves.

    Looking into the night sky you can see the stars marking the same changes as they did long before the stores shelves. The Summer Triangle has moved into the western sky during early evening. The Great Square of Pegasus has moved overhead and a famous bright star is low in the east, we call this star Capella.

  • It’s the time of year when all manner of ghouls and goblins are on the prowl. With this mayhem on my mind, I started thinking about some of the horticultural nightmares I’ve had this year. Luckily, it’s a pretty short list.

  • We have been patient and now it is November and the days are cooler and shorter.

    It is time to finally plant our spring blooming bulbs. Daffodils, hyacinths, crocus and tulips all have pointed tops; plant that end up. Bulbs that don’t have an obvious point often have traces of old roots on the bottom, so plant that end down. You can plant tulips in our area and enjoy them next spring, but do not expect them to flower again in future years.

  • Lately, it seems death has deluged my life. One after another of my friends and acquaintances have left this earthly existence to enter a phenomenally new life.

    While this is inevitable and—in a profound understanding—an enviable occurrence, it is also produces a heartbreaking ache, an acute sense of absence, and an intense realization now is the only moment we have.

  • ATMC’s 52nd annual meeting was an evening filled with fun and excitement, with more than 2,700 people gathering at the Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College to enjoy festivities.

    A barbecue pork and fried chicken dinner was served, along with homemade ice cream.

  • Ghosts, goblins and ghouls were aboard the U.S.S. North Carolina last Friday. Their mission? To frighten all who entered.

    The U.S.S. Battleship North Carolina opened its doors at 6:30 p.m. on Oct.16 for the Ghost Ship--a haunted battleship. With 942 visitors on opening night, Danielle Wallace, battleship programs director, saw her vision, and many months of planning, become a reality.

    Wallace and the battleship staff began preparing for this event in July. She channeled her own fears and used them for inspiration in this year’s ghost ship design.

  • Pumpkin Day—a daylong celebration of fall—is set for this Saturday, Oct. 17, at Indigo Farms, a historic farm straddling the state line near Hickmans Crossroads.

    Celebrate the season and pick a passel of pumpkins during the annual event scheduled from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

  • October is a great month for stargazing. The summer heat has died down, there are fewer bugs, and there is a big baseball diamond in the sky. Because we are finishing baseball season with the World Series, it seems as if the stars want to get in on the action.

    The authentic name for the baseball diamond in the sky is the “Great Square” although you could consider the full name and call it the “Great Square of Pegasus.” Strangely, only three of the four stars belong to the winged horse, Pegasus. One of the four stars belongs to Andromeda.

  • I’ve been telling you for years the cooler days and nights of autumn are a great time to plant trees and shrubs in our mild climate. Plants aren’t stressed as much and have a chance to develop a better root system before the heat and humidity of another southern summer arrives.

    Well, all that’s true for most plants, but there are some selections of my favorite group of summer-flowering plants—crape myrtle—that are better planted in late winter and early spring.