• Creativity and imagination, often with a playful edge, distinguish the work of two artists featured this month at Franklin Square Gallery in Southport.

    Claire Sallenger Martin of Supply has spent a lifetime in the arts, developing her own unique style. Rebecca Pierre of Oak Island, a published poet and professional writer, turned to pottery for yet another form of artistic expression.

    Martin and Pierre will showcase their newest original creations from Aug. 23 to Sept. 25.

  • The Downtown Shallotte Committee's first-ever ArtsFest in Rourk Gardens was a success, organizers said.

    Committee member Karen Hart said the 16 artists who participated all want to return and have ideas for the next ArtsFest. ‘The quality of the art was amazing,’ Hart said. The event also featured a performance by a trio from the Wilmington Symphony.

  • Brunswick County’s summer concert series continues with a performance by Jim Quick & Coastline Band at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 20, in Ocean Isle Beach.

    The free concerts always take place in the parking lot of the Museum of Coastal Carolina.

    Described as an eclectic blend of blues, soul and rock, Coastline is renowned for “hard-driving Carolina backbeats, Georgia-Southern rock, Cajun-inspired grooves.”

  • By Mark Jankowski
    Ingram Planetarium

    Wake up Sun, it is time for the next cycle. 

    Sun-lovers worried about the sun and its lazy low period of activity need not worry any more. NASA has stated the sun is finally waking up. The solar activity that happened during the first week of August was the factor that led to the recent news release that the sun was waking up from the unusual period of low activity called a solar minimum. 

  • BOLIVIA—Leave it to bear-lover Howard Loughlin to deliver the bear facts.

    Shadow and Jerry, two bears who are the last residents of the former Faircloth Zoo, are still lovingly being cared for and returning the appreciation every time the Pender County resident visits them—at least once a week.

    Now, he and two friends are trying to raise enough money to help Shadow, a Syrian Grizzly/black bear mix, and Jerry, a brown Grizzly, be relocated to Lynwood Park Zoo in Jacksonville.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    “Puppet Art” exhibition, Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. For more information, visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

  • Estelle Cartier celebrated her 107th birthday on July 29 at Autumn Care in Shallotte with family members.

    Born in New Brunswick, Canada, she is the youngest of 13 children. Celebrating with her were her daughter and son-in- law, Claire and Gene Connelly, three grandchildren, Kevin, Greg and Dana Connelly, and three great-grandchildren, Kyle, Taylor and Sarah Connelly. She attributes her amazing longevity to ‘life on the farm with good fresh food and clean water.’ 

  • Archaeologist and storyteller Dr. Stanley South will share his historically significant findings with the public at the Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site’s program, “Can You Dig It? A Day with Stanley South: Archaeologist, Storyteller and Author” from 10 a.m-4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 14.

  • Opera House Theatre Company is electrifying the main stage of Thalian Hall with its rendition of “Anything Goes,” which continues Friday, Saturday and Sunday and next weekend in Wilmington.

    The musical, which opened last week, is a classic screwball comedy aboard a transatlantic ship, the S.S. American.

  • August’s sky is full of wonder; however, not the wonder of seeing Mars the size of the full moon.

    Sorry to say that to those prepared to go outside at the end of month hoping to enjoy this celestial wonder.

    Can anyone be safe from the evil, “bad science monster,” restored to life, like a B movie zombie, which invades in-boxes of innocent e-mailers all over the world? Please save everyone and hit delete.

  • ‘T’ Heirs Farm Market off Old Ocean Highway just outside Bolivia has fresh produce available daily. The farm stand's owner, Doris Thornton-Green, also sells her produce at local farmers markets in Shallotte and Southport.

  • Calabash is known as the Seafood Capital of the World, but behind the restaurants, docked in the waterway, are the boats that make Calabash what it is.

    Calabash is a seafood town, but what would it be without its local shrimpers?

    “The docks are open to everyone here,” Mayor Anthony Clemmons said. “The docks have been part of the mystique of Calabash. You come to Calabash and eat and the docks call you down there.”

  • After several years in the making, “Margaret, Pirate Queen” is ready to set sail.

    Brunswick County resident Marsha Tennant, who along with her students wrote the illustrated book based on the pirate adventures of her late, great dog, Margaret, is thrilled the book once targeted for publication by Scholastic has finally been released by a new publisher.

  • In Brunswick County, it’s a no-brainer: Fresh fish is better, and locally caught is best.

    That’s the basis of Brunswick Catch, a group of commercial fishermen, seafood dealers and restaurant owners spawned two years ago to promote locally harvested seafood.

  • BOLIVIA—The enthusiasm level in the room gets higher every time another young cast member in “Annie” enters the rehearsal space at Brunswick Community College.

    The young girls portraying the orphans were laughing, joking and horsing around before a recent rehearsal, but once the director told them to start, they became a professional, polished theater cast.

  • Looking for a cool place to enjoy a hot movie this summer?

    Coastal Stadium 10 at 5200 Bridgers Road in Shallotte has just the tickets.

    The air-conditioned movie theater offers daily show times of the latest 2D and 3D movies.

    The Kids Summer Series continues for the next three weeks, with $1 movies for ages 1 to 100 at 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. “Night at the Museum 2” is the featured flick this Thursday.

  • Everybody thinks they want to be a vet—until they think about.

    I didn’t so much think about becoming a vet, I just was. Some say it’s a “passion” while others call it “pathology.” Either way, working and living with animals is all I’ve known since I was “knee-high to a grasshopper” as we used to say in South Georgia.

    Sure, it’s hard to become a vet and even harder to be one, but it’s the only thing I’ve ever seen myself doing.

  • “A canopy of moss-draped trees leading to the Intracoastal Waterway” is one way to define Gause Landing.

    Or how about “George Washington slept here”? Or “Hurricane Hazel hit here”?

    Jackie Stanley Varnam is among locals who grew up in the area just west of the waterway and south of Ocean Isle Beach, on Hale Beach Road running parallel to Gause Landing Road.

  •   CALABASH—Diners lining up in the Seafood Capital during a busy summer suppertime can see the good-natured debate and choices live on when it comes to eating Calabash-style.

    “This is it!” proclaims a sign and arrow pointing out Beck’s Restaurant near the corner of Beach Drive and River Road.

  • Fast-talking traveling salesman Harold Hill has hit River City, Iowa—and Wilmington—looking to con the townspeople into buying instruments and uniforms for a boys’ band.

    Opera House Theatre Company is presenting its third and final week of “The Music Man” this Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 23-25, on the main stage at Thalian Hall in Wilmington.

    Based on Meredith Willson’s classic production, this local rendition plays at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday with a 3 p.m. matinee Sunday.