• The town of Carolina Shores will have a website photo contest to replace the generic photos now on the town’s homepage.

    The deadline for entering a photo is Oct. 15. Judging of contest entries will be completed on Nov. 1 at the Town Hall workshop. A $25 Food Lion gift certificate will be awarded to the four winners.

    Pictures must be taken within the town of Carolina Shores borders and should show recognizable features within the town and also tell a story.

  • Like most expectant mothers, Chelsea Farmer is nervous about her new arrival.

    The 22-year-old West Brunswick High School graduate is keeping the sex of the baby secret as she prepares for the Dec. 29 due date. She’s excited—but also nervous.

    But sometime after Jan. 1, 2011, what could be mere days after the newest addition to the Farmer family arrives, Chelsea’s husband Patrick will be deployed, most likely to Northern Afghanistan.

  • LELAND—Leafing through his limited-edition “The Andy Griffith Show” prints, George Murray is stocking up for Mayberry Days.

    This week, the Leland artist and frame shop owner will be traveling to the 21st annual festival in Mount Airy, Andy Griffith’s hometown 40 miles north of Winston-Salem, to sell and sign his official “The Andy Griffith Show” prints during the four-day event (Sept. 23-26).

  •  A 70th wedding anniversary is a celebration indeed.

    Two couples in Brunswick County achieved that marital milestone in the same week.

    Connecticut natives Nick and Lillian Szeszkowski were honored at a 71st anniversary party Sept. 9 at Shallotte Assisted Living.

    New Jersey natives Matthew and Theresa’s 70th anniversary was Sept. 7. They were feted with an early surprise party by their family in July.



  • Exquisitely carved wildfowl art by Jim Comer is being featured at Sunset River Marketplace gallery in Calabash through Sept. 18.

    Comer’s work is among the gallery’s most popular displays, gallery owner Ginny Lassiter says.

    Comer produces only 12 to 15 pieces each year, “and they are always in demand,” she says.

  • By Mark Jankowski
    Ingram Planetarium

    Cultures long ago that mapped out the sky with constellations did not include all the stars. 

    The dimmer stars simply did not have any value. The gods saw them as unimportant so then the earliest sky watchers deemed those dim stars the same—unimportant. If the stars were unimportant then there was no need to include them in a figure of bright stars honoring a deity. 


  • Creativity and imagination, often with a playful edge, distinguish the work of two artists featured this month at Franklin Square Gallery in Southport.

    Claire Sallenger Martin of Supply has spent a lifetime in the arts, developing her own unique style. Rebecca Pierre of Oak Island, a published poet and professional writer, turned to pottery for yet another form of artistic expression.

    Martin and Pierre will showcase their newest original creations from Aug. 23 to Sept. 25.

  • The Downtown Shallotte Committee's first-ever ArtsFest in Rourk Gardens was a success, organizers said.

    Committee member Karen Hart said the 16 artists who participated all want to return and have ideas for the next ArtsFest. ‘The quality of the art was amazing,’ Hart said. The event also featured a performance by a trio from the Wilmington Symphony.

  • Brunswick County’s summer concert series continues with a performance by Jim Quick & Coastline Band at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 20, in Ocean Isle Beach.

    The free concerts always take place in the parking lot of the Museum of Coastal Carolina.

    Described as an eclectic blend of blues, soul and rock, Coastline is renowned for “hard-driving Carolina backbeats, Georgia-Southern rock, Cajun-inspired grooves.”

  • By Mark Jankowski
    Ingram Planetarium

    Wake up Sun, it is time for the next cycle. 

    Sun-lovers worried about the sun and its lazy low period of activity need not worry any more. NASA has stated the sun is finally waking up. The solar activity that happened during the first week of August was the factor that led to the recent news release that the sun was waking up from the unusual period of low activity called a solar minimum. 

  • BOLIVIA—Leave it to bear-lover Howard Loughlin to deliver the bear facts.

    Shadow and Jerry, two bears who are the last residents of the former Faircloth Zoo, are still lovingly being cared for and returning the appreciation every time the Pender County resident visits them—at least once a week.

    Now, he and two friends are trying to raise enough money to help Shadow, a Syrian Grizzly/black bear mix, and Jerry, a brown Grizzly, be relocated to Lynwood Park Zoo in Jacksonville.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    “Puppet Art” exhibition, Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. For more information, visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

  • Estelle Cartier celebrated her 107th birthday on July 29 at Autumn Care in Shallotte with family members.

    Born in New Brunswick, Canada, she is the youngest of 13 children. Celebrating with her were her daughter and son-in- law, Claire and Gene Connelly, three grandchildren, Kevin, Greg and Dana Connelly, and three great-grandchildren, Kyle, Taylor and Sarah Connelly. She attributes her amazing longevity to ‘life on the farm with good fresh food and clean water.’ 

  • Archaeologist and storyteller Dr. Stanley South will share his historically significant findings with the public at the Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site’s program, “Can You Dig It? A Day with Stanley South: Archaeologist, Storyteller and Author” from 10 a.m-4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 14.

  • Opera House Theatre Company is electrifying the main stage of Thalian Hall with its rendition of “Anything Goes,” which continues Friday, Saturday and Sunday and next weekend in Wilmington.

    The musical, which opened last week, is a classic screwball comedy aboard a transatlantic ship, the S.S. American.

  • August’s sky is full of wonder; however, not the wonder of seeing Mars the size of the full moon.

    Sorry to say that to those prepared to go outside at the end of month hoping to enjoy this celestial wonder.

    Can anyone be safe from the evil, “bad science monster,” restored to life, like a B movie zombie, which invades in-boxes of innocent e-mailers all over the world? Please save everyone and hit delete.

  • ‘T’ Heirs Farm Market off Old Ocean Highway just outside Bolivia has fresh produce available daily. The farm stand's owner, Doris Thornton-Green, also sells her produce at local farmers markets in Shallotte and Southport.

  • Calabash is known as the Seafood Capital of the World, but behind the restaurants, docked in the waterway, are the boats that make Calabash what it is.

    Calabash is a seafood town, but what would it be without its local shrimpers?

    “The docks are open to everyone here,” Mayor Anthony Clemmons said. “The docks have been part of the mystique of Calabash. You come to Calabash and eat and the docks call you down there.”

  • After several years in the making, “Margaret, Pirate Queen” is ready to set sail.

    Brunswick County resident Marsha Tennant, who along with her students wrote the illustrated book based on the pirate adventures of her late, great dog, Margaret, is thrilled the book once targeted for publication by Scholastic has finally been released by a new publisher.