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Features

  • Retirement didn’t stop Bolivia resident Thelma C. Fullwood from putting her years of knowledge to work.

    After teaching in the Brunswick County School System for 25 years and another six in Virginia, Fullwood retired. After doing some thinking, she recognized a need in young adult literature and decided to tackle the issue.

  • Blues musician Rickey Godfrey is in the coastal Carolinas this week promoting his new CD, “Nasty Man.”

    The CD is described in a press release as “solidly blues-driven with jazz and funk influences that give it an edge and a sound that’s unique to the uber-talented musician.”

    Godfrey will be in the area promoting his new CD starting Thursday, Nov. 11, and continuing through Sunday, Nov. 14.

  • Continuing a long-standing and successful holiday tour tradition, Kathy Mattea brings her spiritual and eclectic Christmas music program, “Songs and the Season,” to Brunswick Community College’s Odell Williamson Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 2.

    The show, featuring Mattea’s band in an “unplugged,” acoustic configuration, draws material from her Grammy Award-winning “Good News” album and from the acclaimed follow-up, “Joy for Christmas Day,” along with some newly recovered songs.

  • An unexpected angel aided a Brunswick County native as she fought to return to North Carolina from Wyoming to be by her sick child’s side.

    Ravin Gore, community development planner with the North Carolina Department of Commerce, was out of town on business when she received a devastating phone call. Gore, formerly of Brunswick County and now a resident of Raleigh, flew to Pinedale, Wyo., to join a team of community development planners on a business trip in mid-September.

  • Looking toward the southeast, a stargazer’s eyes will fix on a bright star just over the treetops. If lucky enough to be on the beach, a stargazer will see the star about 15 degrees above the waves. At 7:15 p.m. in either location, the stars begin their nightly show. That bright star marks the mouth of a fish, and below the fish are some interesting constellations. 

  • Sunset River Marketplace’s Creative Exchange series continues with “Creative Accessorizing Made Easy” by style expert Betsy Russell from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 10.

    The fee is $5 and includes lunch. Due to limited seating, reservations are required.

  • Forget the footstools. This is not your grandmother’s needlepoint. The designs, wall-art pieces, pillows and ornaments featured at Franklin Square Gallery’s First Friday event on Nov. 5 reflect the latest trends in needle arts. 

    The public is invited to visit Franklin Square Gallery throughout the day and then attend the evening reception from 5-7 p.m. as part of downtown Southport’s November Gallery Walk. Admission is free. Two other local galleries, Lantana and Art at 211, will also participate in the evening Gallery Walk.

  • A band nominated for three Carolina Beach Music Awards headlines the entertainment for this year’s Festival By The Sea.

    Six bands will play at the festival on the stage of the Holden Beach Pavilion.

    Making its first appearance at the festival is the Carolina Breakers.

    “They’ve been nominated for three Cammies and new artist of the year,” said festival volunteer Barbara Andrews.

  • Add “competition on national TV” as another accomplishment Shallotte native Lorie Burcham has baked up.

    Burcham, the owner of Crumb de la Crumb infused cake bakery based in Shallotte and now Nashville, returned to Tennessee Oct. 21 after taking part in competition on the Food Network Challenge taped Oct. 19 in Denver, Colo.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—As lots of attention is paid to Breast Cancer Awareness this month, Stephanie Campione believes one facet of that is sorely lacking.

    Campione, a breast cancer survivor, believes more attention should be paid and information made available to what should be done after recovery, including alternatives.

    Campione wants to tell survivors what they can do “after the cancer is gone.”

    Campione said she had a trying experience just like everybody else.

  • Anyone interested in checking out the hot new color for fall hasn’t had to look any farther than Brunswick County this month.

    Firefighters, hair, even a cat’s collar are sporting the hot hue of pink in tribute and observance of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    In addition to visits by Kayla the pink fire engine, several local fire departments have agreed to wear pink T-shirts during October, proving that real firefighters wear pink and can look hot doing so.

  • CALABASH—Maj. Sergej Jakovenko Jr., son of Sergej and Martha Jakovenko of Calabash, was honored at a surprise luncheon last week for his 20 years of service with the United States Air Force.

    The Oct. 15 celebration took place at Nocha White Calabash American Legion Post 503, where Jakovenko’s parents are members.

  • BOLIVIA—Schooldays, lessons learned, singing, dancing and proper spelling—it’s all here in Brunswick Little Theatre’s latest production, “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.”

    BLT’s local rendition of the Tony Award-winning Broadway play debuted last weekend and concludes this weekend at Brunswick Community College.

  • Dana Gause gazed skyward, through the freshly installed wooden trusses of her Habitat for Humanity house where afternoon sunlight, rather than the previous week’s rains, poured through.

    “It’s a blessing,” said the Shallotte cook, recipient of Brunswick County’s first Women Build house, a Habitat project that drew more than 100 female volunteers from throughout the state for the week-long house-raising on Evans Circle that concluded Saturday. The event was orchestrated with assistance from the North Carolina Women’s Missionary Union.

  • HOLDEN BEACH—Three sisters in their 90s recently enjoyed the reunion of a lifetime.

    Oldest sister Wanna McAnally, 97, middle sister Delle Martin, 94, and baby sister Frances Robinson, 91, recently converged for a visit at Robinson’s oceanfront vacation house, “Turtle Trail.”

    They said it was the first time in a long time just the three of them had had a chance to spend a few days together.

    Year-round, Robinson lives in Jamestown, McAnally lives in High Point and Martin lives in Eden.

  • What has contributed to Geneva Grissett’s long life of 100 years? 

    An active faith in God, a loving family, and a healthy lifestyle with good food and plenty of exercise in the form of hard work.  

    She was a great cook; just ask her family, her church family and the people who worked on her farm. She could also sew anything, from dresses to quilts. She gardened and raised chickens for meat and eggs, and she even built the stools people sat on around the dinner table.

  • BY FRANK RICHARDSON

    SUNSET BEACH—They say every setback makes you stronger, right?

    Those are words from Sigmund Johnson, a musician with the 82nd Airborne Division Band before its performance at the Sunset at Sunset festival Oct. 2.

    He and the other band members have surely had their share of setbacks lately, beginning three months ago with a warehouse fire at Fort Bragg that wiped out their uniforms, instruments and sheet music.

  • Paws-Ability’s third annual Wag Shag is set for 1-4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24, at Sea Trail Convention Center.

    Paws-Ability founder Janie Withers is promising it will be bigger and better than ever.

    In fact, she says, it is the largest social event for canines and their humans in the state.

    Wag Shag “has grown to be quite the social event for dogs to see and be seen this year,” Withers says, adding it allows attendees—both canine and human—to come decked out in their Halloween finery.

  • By Mark Jankowski

    Ingram Planetarium senior engineer

    Autumn has sprung. Wait a minute. Can autumn spring? Well, maybe I should say autumn has fallen. The temperatures do not reflect the change of seasons but daylight is growing shorter, school buses are on the road again, and stores have winter coats on display. That is just the change here on the ground.

  • The town of Carolina Shores will have a website photo contest to replace the generic photos now on the town’s homepage.

    The deadline for entering a photo is Oct. 15. Judging of contest entries will be completed on Nov. 1 at the Town Hall workshop. A $25 Food Lion gift certificate will be awarded to the four winners.

    Pictures must be taken within the town of Carolina Shores borders and should show recognizable features within the town and also tell a story.